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Agile Computing: Article

My Thoughts on Ulitzer

Ulitzer is helping me increase my content reach, providing a nice SEO boost

Ok, so, here are my thoughts on Ulitzer...

As a blogger, I focus on traffic and I spend quite a lot of time optimizing my SEO.

Since the target audience of my articles is much greater than the reach of my blog, Ulitzer is actually helping me increase my content reach.

Moreover, Ulitzer does it in a very fair way since links back to my posts or other locations are without the evil "nofollow" - providing a nice SEO boost.

It also gives me some good metrics that are very useful data points on the effectiveness of my blog articles.

And last but not least, it allows my article to appears in the news listings of the two major search engines, which is a very nice channel extension.

So, all of this means that, while Ulitzer might be seen as a competing channel to bloggers, I think that bloggers should realize the tremendous value it could bring to their blog.

I think to materialize this value to bloggers, some sort of WordPress plugin would be very useful. I think that allowing bloggers to show and combine Ulitzer/SYS-CON stats, comments, Tweets/ReTweets with their blog posts would be a killer feature.

Another approach would be to expose a simple REST API (just HTTP JSON gets) and do a sample Wordpress plugin showing developers how to integrate Wordpress with Ulitzer.

Anyway, just some random thoughts and recommendations from a Ulitzer user.

More Stories By Jeremy Chone

Jeremy Chone is chief technology officer (CTO) and vice president of development and operations at iJuris, an innovative startup offering a rich Web application for lawyer collaboration and document assembly. In his role as CTO and vice president of development and operations, Jeremy is responsible for overseeing the company’s strategic direction for the iJuris service and technology as well as managing the service architecture, development, and operations.

Chone has more than 10 years of technical and business experience in major software companies such as Netscape, Oracle and Adobe where he has successfully aligned technology visions with business opportunities that deliver tangible results. In addition to a combination of technical and business acumen, Jeremy also possesses an in-depth knowledge of Rich Internet Application technologies, as well as holding many patents in the mobile and enterprise collaboration areas.

See Jeremy Chone's full biography

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Most Recent Comments
CarrieRawks 09/19/09 12:41:00 AM EDT

I haven't been using this site for a long time, but I can obviously see it's worth to bloggers. I do agree about having a wordpress plugin, that would be nice too. Let's just see what happens.

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