Welcome!

@CloudExpo Authors: Zakia Bouachraoui, Elizabeth White, Yeshim Deniz, Liz McMillan, Pat Romanski

Related Topics: @CloudExpo, Microservices Expo

@CloudExpo: Blog Feed Post

Why Policy is the Future of Storage

In the future, simple policy creation and enforcement will be a necessary part of storage pool creation

As many of you may know, I work for EMC’s Cloud Infrastructure Group as part of the Atmos solution team. In this role, I’ve been blessed with getting a closer look at where the future of cloud storage is going as well as some of the drivers that will get it there. In this post, I’d like to talk a bit about policy and how this will shape the future of storage. I’m going to keep this as abstracted from product as possible, but where appropriate, I’ll try to show you how products are implementing this technology TODAY.

What is Policy?

By definition, policy is “[an] action or procedure conforming to or considered with reference to prudence or expediency” (dictionary.com for that definition).  When viewed in the context of storage systems and management, policy, then, is the actions (scripted or otherwise) that influence data to provide for retrieval, performance, or manipulation by systems.  In other words, policy is an engine that manages data from start to finish.  Why this is important requires us to look at what the typical management stack looks like today.

Data is created by users accessing programs that are tied to physical and virtual resources.  This generated data is then processed and stored by the programs and their underlying storage I/O layers (LVMs, hypervisor I/O stacks, etc.) onto some sort of storage device (SAN, NAS, DAS, etc.) where it sits until next access.  In essence, once data is created it is considered to be “at rest” until it is next accessed (if ever).  Within this data generation and storage continuum, the process is fundamentally simple as generated data is put directly to storage.  However, if the data continues to sit in the same place endlessly, it’s typically inefficient to retrieve and access.  Managing this data was typically a manual process where data, LUNs, and their topologies had to be moved around using array or host-based tools to provide better “fit” for data at rest or data accesses for performance.  This is where policy steps in.

Policy uses hooks into data (also known as metadata) in order to enact controls.  Please see this post for more detailed explanation of metadata.

Why use Policies?

If the previous example shows anything, it’s that the management of data is fundamentally…well, boring and manual.  Policy provides a method of controlling the stack of data ingest AND data management while allowing business to continue to generate, retrieve, and manipulate data.  For example, a simple policy that could be enacted against data could be as follows:

if data < 14 days old, store on EFD drives, LUN 11; if > 14 days old, store on SATA drives, LUN 33

Obviously, that’s a high-level abstraction of what the actual process for data control would look like but drives the point home.  What used to be a manual LUN migration policy to “performance” or “store” data now is set based on a logical control structure that can be automagically enacted on the storage system itself.  A working example of this type of policy can be seen in the EMC Atmos product as well as within the tiering provided by Compellent and EMC’s FAST systems for storage management.  Pretty cool, huh?

An alternative method of control that isn’t necessary tied to the storage array is the recent introduction of VMware’s Storage DRS (Dynamic Resource Scheduling) which is enacted against the storage I/O stack of VMware’s vSphere hypervisor.

The Future of Policy

Obviously, my examples are very simplistic in nature but hopefully, they make the policy technology somewhat more accessible.  As far as policy futures are concerned, this is where storage technologies (and even host process management) will be going.  In the future, simple policy creation and enforcement will be a necessary part of storage pool creation and integration as well as the ongoing maintenance and support of storage arrays.

As always, feedback is welcome!

Reblog this post [with Zemanta]

Read the original blog entry...

More Stories By Dave Graham

Dave Graham is a Technical Consultant with EMC Corporation where he focused on designing/architecting private cloud solutions for commercial customers.

Comments (0)

Share your thoughts on this story.

Add your comment
You must be signed in to add a comment. Sign-in | Register

In accordance with our Comment Policy, we encourage comments that are on topic, relevant and to-the-point. We will remove comments that include profanity, personal attacks, racial slurs, threats of violence, or other inappropriate material that violates our Terms and Conditions, and will block users who make repeated violations. We ask all readers to expect diversity of opinion and to treat one another with dignity and respect.


CloudEXPO Stories
Your job is mostly boring. Many of the IT operations tasks you perform on a day-to-day basis are repetitive and dull. Utilizing automation can improve your work life, automating away the drudgery and embracing the passion for technology that got you started in the first place. In this presentation, I'll talk about what automation is, and how to approach implementing it in the context of IT Operations. Ned will discuss keys to success in the long term and include practical real-world examples. Get started on automating your way to a brighter future!
The challenges of aggregating data from consumer-oriented devices, such as wearable technologies and smart thermostats, are fairly well-understood. However, there are a new set of challenges for IoT devices that generate megabytes or gigabytes of data per second. Certainly, the infrastructure will have to change, as those volumes of data will likely overwhelm the available bandwidth for aggregating the data into a central repository. Ochandarena discusses a whole new way to think about your next-gen applications and how to address the challenges of building applications that harness all data types and sources.
Lori MacVittie is a subject matter expert on emerging technology responsible for outbound evangelism across F5's entire product suite. MacVittie has extensive development and technical architecture experience in both high-tech and enterprise organizations, in addition to network and systems administration expertise. Prior to joining F5, MacVittie was an award-winning technology editor at Network Computing Magazine where she evaluated and tested application-focused technologies including app security and encryption-related solutions. She holds a B.S. in Information and Computing Science from the University of Wisconsin at Green Bay, and an M.S. in Computer Science from Nova Southeastern University, and is an O'Reilly author.
CloudEXPO New York 2018, colocated with DevOpsSUMMIT and DXWorldEXPO New York 2018 will be held November 12-13, 2018, in New York City and will bring together Cloud Computing, FinTech and Blockchain, Digital Transformation, Big Data, Internet of Things, DevOps, AI and Machine Learning to one location.
CloudEXPO | DevOpsSUMMIT | DXWorldEXPO are the world's most influential, independent events where Cloud Computing was coined and where technology buyers and vendors meet to experience and discuss the big picture of Digital Transformation and all of the strategies, tactics, and tools they need to realize their goals. Sponsors of DXWorldEXPO | CloudEXPO benefit from unmatched branding, profile building and lead generation opportunities.