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Top 20 Cloud Services Providers That Are Gaining Mind Share

So here is my purely subjective list of the Top 20 Cloud Services Providers gaining mind share

There is little doubt that cloud computing is big news, but who is gaining your mind share?  Amazon, NetSuite, and Salesforce.com, have been in the news recently with a number of announcements.

So many that I’ve been attempting to track them by creating specific journals for each.

Our experiences are likely to be different, and barring actual surveys and research, is subjective and based largely on our own impressions and perceptions of which companies are in the news or making news in this segment.

There are several lists that are excellent points of reference – The Top 150 Players in Cloud Computing, 85 Cloud Computing Vendors Shaping the Emerging Cloud, and The VAR Guy’s SaaS 20 Index.

Large technology companies like AT&T, EMC / VMware, HP, IBM, Microsoft, Unisys, and others that come to mind have not been included below in the top 20 that are gaining mind share, and I would expect that for most of these companies the focus would be the largest of enterprises with very large complex engagements.

So here is my (purely subjective) list of the Top 20 Cloud Services Providers gaining mind share.

  1. Amazon (AWS) (Scalable on demand infrastructure)
  2. Appirio (On demand acceleration products and services)
  3. Astadia (Business consulting and SaaS solutions)
  4. Bluewolf (On demand software deployment services)
  5. Boomi (SaaS integration),
  6. CohesiveFT (Realtime custom (virtual) server build),
  7. Constant Contact (Marketing)
  8. FreshBooks (Billing and invoice management)
  9. Google Apps (Productivity Tools – Gmail, Gtalk, GCal, GDocs, GSites)
  10. Intacct (On Demand Financial applications),
  11. Intuit (Financial Software)
  12. Joyent (Scalable on demand infrastructure)
  13. LongJump, (PaaS for SaaS rapid application development),
  14. Model Metrics (Force.com and cloud services integration),
  15. NetSuite (On demand, integrated business management software)
  16. Salesforce (CRM and Force.com development platform)
  17. Vertica (Analytics database for cloud computing)
  18. Zoho (Productivity Suite)
  19. Zuora (Subscription billing for the cloud – more extensive than paypal – support Salesforce.com enterprise / pro editions), and
  20. 37Signals, (Best known for its BasecampHQ project management software, and Highrise contact management software).
Industry focused mentions go to:
Clearly this isn’t an all inclusive list of all the excellent work being done by numerous companies in this segment, but simply a list of those gaining my mind share.  Who’s gaining on yours?
-Tune The Future-

More Stories By Ray DePena

Ray DePena worked at IBM for over 12 years in various senior global roles in managed hosting sales, services sales, global marketing programs (business innovation), marketing management, partner management, and global business development.
His background includes software development, computer networking, systems engineering, and IT project management. He holds an MBA in Information Systems, Marketing, and International Business from New York University’s Stern School of Business, and a BBA in Computer Systems from the City University of New York at Baruch College.

Named one of the World's 30 Most Influential Cloud Computing Bloggers in 2009, Top 50 Bloggers on Cloud Computing in 2010, and Top 100 Bloggers on Cloud Computing in 2011, he is the Founder and Editor of Amazon.com Journal,Competitive Business Innovation Journal,and Salesforce.com Journal.

He currently serves as an Industry Advisor for the Higher Education Sector on a National Science Foundation Initiative on Computational Thinking. Born and raised in New York City, Mr. DePena now lives in northern California. He can be followed on:

Twitter: @RayDePena   |   LinkedIn   |   Facebook   |   Google+

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