Welcome!

@CloudExpo Authors: Liz McMillan, Elizabeth White, Yeshim Deniz, Pat Romanski, Zakia Bouachraoui

Related Topics: @CloudExpo, Microservices Expo

@CloudExpo: Blog Feed Post

Why Public Clouds Are Looking Hot (Again)

Public clouds have all the benefits that have been written about extensively

Seems like it was only yesterday when industry pundits were backing away from public clouds in favor of the safer, more big-vendor-compliant “private clouds.” After Amazon shook things up with its new paradigm for computing and storage clouds in 2007, and started to gain traction (along with Rackspace and other cloud providers) in 2008 and 2009 – 2010 so far has been in many ways a retreat from the forces of innovation and the emergence of much fear, uncertainty and doubt about the perils of the public cloud. But lately, I’m seeing the pendulum start to swing back in favor of public clouds, albeit with a twist.

Not surprisingly, private clouds look more familiar and comfortable to IT managers, big vendors and consulting/SI/service providers. They involve purchases of hardware, software and services through traditional enterprise procurement processes. They allow resources to stay behind the firewall under enterprise control. They fall within the existing legal, compliance and audit structures. With the addition of many flavors of “cloud in a box” offerings, they start to address the main issues that drove developers to the public clouds to begin with: self-service, provisioning on demand and the ability to get access to more scalable resources without requiring large upfront cap ex.

Public clouds have all the benefits that have been written about extensively (horizontal scaling, true on-demand capabilities, pure op ex, etc.). But for much of this year, the debate in the industry has been all about how worried everyone is about using public clouds (security, control, etc. etc.), and how uncertain they are about whether IaaS will really take off.

But there are some recent indications that the public cloud is hot again. A great study by Appirio speaks to growing industry comfort with public clouds and the likelihood that these will have a dominant place in IT infrastructure. At the Up2010 cloud event this week in San Francisco, Doug Hauger, GM of Microsoft’s Azure cloud, referred to this study extensively to make the point that public clouds are gaining credibility. James Staten of Forrester recently blogged about his predictions for 2011, including: “You will build a private cloud and it will fail.” His point is not to discredit private clouds as an approach but to remind companies beginning this process how incredibly hard it is to build a large, scalable, on-demand, multi-tenant cloud – even just for internal users.

Staten’s predictions make the case for how the cloud market has evolved in 2010, as enterprises planned their cloud strategies, implemented their pilots and defined their cloud architectures. Rather than seeing public clouds as “the other alternative” to private ones, enterprises and vendors have begun to view these as compatible strategies in a more sophisticated hybrid cloud model.

We’re huge fans of the hybrid model at CloudSwitch, and it’s great to see customers embracing public clouds as extensions of their private ones (as well as of their traditional virtualized data centers). The critical point about public clouds is that they allow testing, innovation and quick success or failure to happen in a low-cost way. This learning is imperative for the hybrid model, and public clouds are here now, today, working well and allowing enterprises to gain experience and log cloud mileage as they build out the rest of their cloud infrastructures. With CloudSwitch, these companies are now able to view the public cloud as a safe and seamless extension of their internal environment, in effect turning the public cloud into a “private” cloud as well.

Read the original blog entry...

More Stories By Ellen Rubin

Ellen Rubin is the CEO and co-founder of ClearSky Data, an enterprise storage company that recently raised $27 million in a Series B investment round. She is an experienced entrepreneur with a record in leading strategy, market positioning and go-to- market efforts for fast-growing companies. Most recently, she was co-founder of CloudSwitch, a cloud enablement software company, acquired by Verizon in 2011. Prior to founding CloudSwitch, Ellen was the vice president of marketing at Netezza, where as a member of the early management team, she helped grow the company to more than $130 million in revenues and a successful IPO in 2007. Ellen holds an MBA from Harvard Business School and an undergraduate degree magna cum laude from Harvard University.

CloudEXPO Stories
The current age of digital transformation means that IT organizations must adapt their toolset to cover all digital experiences, beyond just the end users’. Today’s businesses can no longer focus solely on the digital interactions they manage with employees or customers; they must now contend with non-traditional factors. Whether it's the power of brand to make or break a company, the need to monitor across all locations 24/7, or the ability to proactively resolve issues, companies must adapt to the new world.
"IBM is really all in on blockchain. We take a look at sort of the history of blockchain ledger technologies. It started out with bitcoin, Ethereum, and IBM evaluated these particular blockchain technologies and found they were anonymous and permissionless and that many companies were looking for permissioned blockchain," stated René Bostic, Technical VP of the IBM Cloud Unit in North America, in this SYS-CON.tv interview at 21st Cloud Expo, held Oct 31 – Nov 2, 2017, at the Santa Clara Convention Center in Santa Clara, CA.
In this presentation, you will learn first hand what works and what doesn't while architecting and deploying OpenStack. Some of the topics will include:- best practices for creating repeatable deployments of OpenStack- multi-site considerations- how to customize OpenStack to integrate with your existing systems and security best practices.
Everyone wants the rainbow - reduced IT costs, scalability, continuity, flexibility, manageability, and innovation. But in order to get to that collaboration rainbow, you need the cloud! In this presentation, we'll cover three areas: First - the rainbow of benefits from cloud collaboration. There are many different reasons why more and more companies and institutions are moving to the cloud. Benefits include: cost savings (reducing on-prem infrastructure, reducing data center foot print, reducing IT support costs), enabling growth (ensuring a highly available, highly scalable infrastructure), increasing employee access & engagement (by having collaboration tools that are usable and available globally regardless of location there will be an increased connectedness amongst teams and individuals that will help increase both efficiency and productivity.)
Founded in 2000, Chetu Inc. is a global provider of customized software development solutions and IT staff augmentation services for software technology providers. By providing clients with unparalleled niche technology expertise and industry experience, Chetu has become the premiere long-term, back-end software development partner for start-ups, SMBs, and Fortune 500 companies. Chetu is headquartered in Plantation, Florida, with thirteen offices throughout the U.S. and abroad.