Welcome!

@CloudExpo Authors: Dana Gardner, Pat Romanski, Liz McMillan, Yeshim Deniz, Elizabeth White

Related Topics: @CloudExpo, Open Source Cloud, Government Cloud

@CloudExpo: Article

Open Government = Social Innovation

Governments can build local social enterprise portals to fluidly meet the deep needs of society

Tami McEvoy

Our McS consulting practice specializes in fast-tracking cutting edge, new innovations such as Cloud computing, Open Government and Social Innovation.

These can be utilized by start-ups, providing them a unique invention to launch and grow their business, and it can also be leveraged by large organizations and governments.

The essential ingredient is that rather than these being seperate, standalone topics, the critical point is how they overlap and enable one another. As the title suggests, Open Government is actually a form of Social Innovation.

Canadian Federal Government research explains this, highlighting how Social Innovation is defined through this union, the sweet spot where business innovation overlaps with community innovation.

However as their other report shows there isn't yet enough uptake or progress:

"The report highlights the urgency of the social challenges before us, such as climate change, sustainability, poverty and globalization, particularly in the midst of a global economic downturn, and points to the importance of fostering SI as a solution."

This is where Open Government can be utilized for great value, for enabling much more dynamic and scalable organizational capabilities.

Social Enterprise Innovation
My Guid Life project was one example of this, demonstrating some key principles of Social Business, and also Open Government.

Faced with depleting government funding my remit was to enable local social organizations in Scotland to become more financially sustainable, able to generate their own revenues and reduce their reliance on grants.

Social organizations originate in response to a social need 'at the coal face' and therefore typically start very small, often with only one staff member and perhaps two or three helpful volunteers. Therefore becoming commercially proficient is often too significant a challenge to overcome, and so by aggregating their needs we were able to develop centralized, shared services for them to take advantage of to meet this need.

To get their organization off the ground they needed what all others do too, like a web site to showcase their presence and attract customers and volunteers, and press promotions to announce this to the world.

However as very small micro-organizations these capabilities were out of their reach and so we deployed a central portal site, based on Open Source software, that used Web 2.0 features to enable community collaboration between the 350,000 local residents, including young and old so that it also helped bridge the generational as well as the digital divides.

The portal also included an important feature of 'micro-sites'. These were simple tools that enabled non-technical social entrepreneurs to publish their own web site, and publish it into the directory within the site.

We then conducted press marketing on behalf of the whole site and drew in traffic which they all shared and enjoyed, thus they each integrated business services into their organization but without having to take on the resource directly themselves.

Cloud organization
Cultivating this ecosystem of social organizations highlights the overlap with government, as each one provided some form of "social service", even as simple as companionship for the isolated elderly.

Meeting the needs of such a large volume of small needs is not the strength of government, who have the scale for large social services like hospitals but can be overly bureaucratic and unable to adapt to the wide spectrum of different needs at this level.

Therefore it's their combination that's ideal. Through new vehicles like 'Social Impact Bonds' governments can invest in cultivating these community-driven supplier networks, that can work in partnership with their own agencies to offer an equally diverse and localized spectrum of services.

In their white paper ‘Constellation Model of Collaborative Social Change‘ the pioneers of the Toronto Centre for Social Innovation describe how fluid collaborations across multiple stakeholder groups in government, businesses and social organizations are key to driving successful change projects.

In essence this platform achieves for organizations and people what Cloud computing does for IT applications and resources, a scalable framework for more fluidly adapting to societal needs the same way.

More Stories By Cloud Best Practices Network

The Cloud Best Practices Network is an expert community of leading Cloud pioneers. Follow our best practice blogs at http://CloudBestPractices.net

CloudEXPO Stories
The use of containers by developers -- and now increasingly IT operators -- has grown from infatuation to deep and abiding love. But as with any long-term affair, the honeymoon soon leads to needing to live well together ... and maybe even getting some relationship help along the way. And so it goes with container orchestration and automation solutions, which are rapidly emerging as the means to maintain the bliss between rapid container adoption and broad container use among multiple cloud hosts. This BriefingsDirect cloud services maturity discussion focuses on new ways to gain container orchestration, to better use serverless computing models, and employ inclusive management to keep the container love alive.
Artificial intelligence, machine learning, neural networks. We're in the midst of a wave of excitement around AI such as hasn't been seen for a few decades. But those previous periods of inflated expectations led to troughs of disappointment. This time is (mostly) different. Applications of AI such as predictive analytics are already decreasing costs and improving reliability of industrial machinery. Pattern recognition can equal or exceed the ability of human experts in some domains. It's developing into an increasingly commercially important technology area. (Although it's also easy to look at wins in specific domains and generalize to an overly-optimistic view of AI writ large.) In this session, Red Hat Technology Evangelist for Emerging Technology Gordon Haff will examine the AI landscape and identify those domains and approaches that have seen genuine advance and why. He'll also ...
Is advanced scheduling in Kubernetes achievable?Yes, however, how do you properly accommodate every real-life scenario that a Kubernetes user might encounter? How do you leverage advanced scheduling techniques to shape and describe each scenario in easy-to-use rules and configurations? In his session at @DevOpsSummit at 21st Cloud Expo, Oleg Chunikhin, CTO at Kublr, answered these questions and demonstrated techniques for implementing advanced scheduling. For example, using spot instances and cost-effective resources on AWS, coupled with the ability to deliver a minimum set of functionalities that cover the majority of needs – without configuration complexity.
Today we can collect lots and lots of performance data. We build beautiful dashboards and even have fancy query languages to access and transform the data. Still performance data is a secret language only a couple of people understand. The more business becomes digital the more stakeholders are interested in this data including how it relates to business. Some of these people have never used a monitoring tool before. They have a question on their mind like "How is my application doing" but no idea how to get a proper answer.
The term "digital transformation" (DX) is being used by everyone for just about any company initiative that involves technology, the web, ecommerce, software, or even customer experience. While the term has certainly turned into a buzzword with a lot of hype, the transition to a more connected, digital world is real and comes with real challenges. In his opening keynote, Four Essentials To Become DX Hero Status Now, Jonathan Hoppe, Co-Founder and CTO of Total Uptime Technologies, shared that beyond the hype, digital transformation initiatives are infusing IT budgets with critical investment for technology. This is shifting the IT organization from a cost center/center of efficiency to one that is strategic for revenue growth. CIOs are working with the new reality of cloud, mobile-first, and digital initiatives across all areas of their businesses. What's more, top IT talent wants to w...