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Essential Issues, Such as Licensing and Billing, in the Cloud Will Make or Break ISV Success

The new frontier of the Cloud hasn't been designed to accommodate software vendors who want their products to work in the cloud, says JNBridge's Wayne Citrin

DENVER, March 21, 2011 /PRNewswire/ --

    Who:      Wayne Citrin
              CTO
              JNBridge
              (www.jnbridge.com)

               Citrin is Chief Technology Officer at JNBridge. He is the
               architect of JNBridge Pro, and has been devoted to Java and
               .NET interoperability issues since .NET's beta days, more than
               nine years ago. Prior to co-founding JNBridge, Citrin was a
               leading researcher in programming languages and compilers, and
               was on the Computer Engineering faculty at the University of
               Colorado, Boulder. He was a researcher at IBM's research lab in
               Zurich, Switzerland and has a Ph.D. from the University of
               California, Berkeley, in Computer Science. He has given
               presentations at JavaOne, Microsoft's TechEd and TechReady, and
               numerous academic and technical conferences.

    What:     ISVs and the Cloud
               If you ask most people how software vendors can move into the
               cloud, they will say that the vendor should take their
               traditional products, put them in the cloud, and offer them as
               services. But what about other software vendors who create
               components that other developers incorporate into their own
               programs? In most cases, offering the component as a service
               doesn't make sense.

               The main challenge to running components in Cloud-based
               programs has to do with essential issues, like licensing and
               billing. Windows Azure has absolutely no provision for third-
               party licensing and billing. It's a chicken-and-egg problem.
               If Microsoft is serious about its software partners producing
               for Azure (and not just end-user customers creating custom
               applications), Microsoft will have to jump-start the market by
               offering their own billing mechanism.

               One would think that barriers to entry wouldn't be there, and
               that Cloud providers would do all they could to encourage
               software vendors to help settle this new frontier. Without a
               robust partner community for both Azure and Amazon Web
               Services, Cloud adoption will be that much slower for everyone.

               The industry needs interoperability solutions for IT
               organizations that need to integrate Java and Microsoft .NET
               applications running in the Cloud - especially as a high-
               performance alternative to existing Web services protocols. The
               vision of Cloud interoperability should be any object, on any
               platform, in any language, anywhere, and at any time. Solutions
               such as this are needed because existing web services protocols
               are too slow for IT organizations trying to meet demanding
               service level agreements frequently associated with Cloud
    How:       computing, Citrin says.

               To read Wayne Citrin's full blog post on this topic please
               visit: (http://www.jnbridge.com/jn/?p=277)

               For more information or to set up an interview with Wayne
    Contact:   Citrin, please contact:
              Christie Denniston
              Catapult PR-IR
              303-581-7760, ext. 13
              ([email protected])

SOURCE JNBridge

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