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ODCA Tries to Flex Its Cloud Computing Muscles

Eight New Models Define What it Expects from Vendors

If you can judge the strength of an IT movement by the number of alliances it creates, then Cloud Computing must be doing all right.

In fact, an alliance created last fall, the Open Data Center Alliance (ODCA) was formed, in part, to curb the strength of many Cloud vendors, and force them to concentrate on taking care of their customers.

Just as the Magna Carta in 1215 was about the rights of powerful landlords (not the common folk) vs. the king, the ODCA is about the rights of powerful IT buyers rather than individual users. But, as with the the Magna Carta, one hopes that the benefits eventually reach us all.

The ODCA is being driven to some degree by Intel, and is featured as part of the chip giant's Cloud marketing efforts from its Swindon, UK office. The organization's steering committee features CTO-level heavy hitters from big companies throughout the world: Lockheed Martin, BMW, Deutsche Bank, Marriott, Disney, and some large Chinese enterprises are on a steering committee that is headed by infrastructure provider Terremark.

ODCA members are said to steer more than $100 billion in annual IT purchases. It now claims 280 members.

Now the ODCA has come out with what it calls "models" that it wants major Cloud providers to follow. "Cloud-based suppliers need to think about these before trying to pick up (our) business," thundered a recent ODCA announcement.

The models come under four headings: secure federation, automation, common management and policy, and transparency. The goal is to establish standard frameworks and many granular specifications. It's a power play, pure and simple, and represents the seriousness with which big enterprises are taking Cloud Computing.

The ODCA also professes a concern about too much hype in the market about Cloud Computing. Hype? Here?

I'm shocked, shocked.

http://www.twitter.com/strukhoff

More Stories By Roger Strukhoff

Roger Strukhoff (@IoT2040) is Executive Director of the Tau Institute for Global ICT Research, with offices in Illinois and Manila. He is Conference Chair of @CloudExpo & @ThingsExpo, and Editor of SYS-CON Media's CloudComputing BigData & IoT Journals. He holds a BA from Knox College & conducted MBA studies at CSU-East Bay.

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