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Top Five Questions Asked by CloudSwitch Customers

How do I move applications to the cloud?

By Dave Armlin, Director of Customer Support

New CloudSwitch customers and prospects are coming up to speed every week and there are a number of questions that show up frequently enough that I thought it would be helpful to cover them in a blog. When we work with customers, our goal is to make their experience getting started in the cloud fast and easy, and to make sure they feel comfortable with the ongoing simplicity and security of the CloudSwitch model.

Here are their top five questions:

1. How do I move applications to the cloud?
CloudSwitch literally makes moving an application to the cloud a simple drag-and-drop operation. A virtual machine (or group of VMs) is selected from a VM location (vCenter,ESX machine, or CIFS share) in the CloudSwitch user interface, the target public cloud region/zone/location is selected, and the machine is moved over a secure tunnel to the cloud.  Storage for the virtual machine in the cloud is automatically allocated and encrypted, and keys are kept under the customer’s control.

Virtual machines that are moved to the cloud retain their MAC and IP addresses, since the CloudSwitch appliance acts as a layer-2 bridge allowing these machines to appear as if they are running in the data center behind your firewall.

2. What applications should I move to the cloud?
A wide variety of apps are good candidates to be moved to the cloud.  As Ellen Rubin blogged about recently, legacy applications are certainly great candidates for offloading from your internal data centers. Web servers and web applications like SharePoint, .NET, J2EE/SOA, Drupal, Wordpress, Wikis, corporate intranets, or batch processing applications are all good candidates as well.

When selecting applications for the cloud, you need to be aware of latency between the data center and the cloud. Latency is a function of physical distance between the data center and the cloud region you’ve selected. For instance, a data center on the East Coast in the US should see around 20ms latency between the various public cloud regions on the East Coast.

Select applications and place them in closest proximity to the virtual machines and data center services that are accessed most by these applications. For instance, a web application that utilizes a database heavily may perform best if the web tier and the database are both deployed to the same cloud and region.  A web application that utilizes a database infrequently and caches results may perform well with the database in the data center and the web tier in the cloud.

3. What changes to my network do I have to make to use CloudSwitch?
Minimal. Outbound port 443 to the Internet has to be opened for the CloudSwitch appliance to create a secure encrypted connection to the cloud. This is outbound traffic only, nothing inbound. There are no changes to your network configurations.

The CloudSwitch appliance requires promiscuous mode and forged transmits set to “Allow” on the Virtual Switch or Port Group for the network adapter assigned to CloudSwitch in your virtual environment. For more information, check out this blog article on networking and ESX.

4. Can I get a virtual physical console to my machine in the cloud?
Yes. CloudSwitch provides a virtual console accessible from the CloudSwitch user interface via a browser that allows you to interact with the base system to make network changes or other tasks one might perform at a physical console. Access to this console can be secured to specific users or groups using Role-Based Access Controls (RBAC) in the CloudSwitch user interface.

5. Can I allow traffic from the Internet reach my machines in the cloud directly as opposed to going through my corporate firewall?
Yes, CloudSwitch supplies a cloud firewall that allows you to assign a public IP to a virtual machine and control access to VMs in the cloud from the Internet. Pavan Pant, our Director of Product Management, blogged about this a while back. You have full configurability for permissions/access to all cloud resources through this firewall.

Read the original blog entry...

More Stories By Ellen Rubin

Ellen Rubin is the CEO and co-founder of ClearSky Data, an enterprise storage company that recently raised $27 million in a Series B investment round. She is an experienced entrepreneur with a record in leading strategy, market positioning and go-to- market efforts for fast-growing companies. Most recently, she was co-founder of CloudSwitch, a cloud enablement software company, acquired by Verizon in 2011. Prior to founding CloudSwitch, Ellen was the vice president of marketing at Netezza, where as a member of the early management team, she helped grow the company to more than $130 million in revenues and a successful IPO in 2007. Ellen holds an MBA from Harvard Business School and an undergraduate degree magna cum laude from Harvard University.

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