Welcome!

@CloudExpo Authors: Roger Strukhoff, Yeshim Deniz, Pat Romanski, Zakia Bouachraoui, Elizabeth White

Related Topics: @CloudExpo, Microservices Expo

@CloudExpo: Blog Feed Post

The Cloud’s Tipping Point

I always enjoy hearing from those of you who have come to the conclusion that cloud computing will not work

I always enjoy hearing from those of you who have come to the conclusion that cloud computing will not work, and decided you will not be developing plans to shift your business to the Cloud.

Sometimes the analysis is sound. More often than not, it omits key variables.

Perhaps you relied too much on vendor input for key variables in your analysis, or on your own in-house staff that may not necessarily have the skills, experience, or vested interest in such analysis. After all, how often do they undertake such an analysis in the first place? How well does it compare to an unbiased, independent consultant?

As I mentioned in, “Cloud Computing Economics: 40-80% Savings in the Cloud?“, your best bet is an independent analysis by an objective 3rd party.

Though instead of debating the merits of an analysis, the extent of cost savings, or other business benefits of migrating to the Cloud, I would like you to consider an another perspective.

What’s your alternative?

The inevitable answer that I usually hear is, “We’ll just continue doing what we’re doing”. That answer is quite telling. It’s clear that they have not considered Cloud computing’s tipping point.

You see, as Cloud computing continues to gain traction in the market, and Cloud interoperability improves, the value of its network effect increases, creating a bandwagon effect, and ultimately driving software providers to change their legacy business model, or into decline.

Some business leaders assume that they will be able to continue their legacy IT consumption practices unimpeded, and that their costs will not be impacted by the Cloud’s success. On the contrary, remaining on unsupported software will increase your IT costs. Finding skilled resources to support and develop on legacy software, and systems is not easy or inexpensive.

Today, the Cloud’s tipping point, may not be an issue for you unless you want the benefits your competitors are deriving from SaaS applications, as you can’t consume them any other way. No, Salesforce.com will not be sending you any shrink wrapped software by mail. You’ll have to sign up for the service like everyone else.

In any event, whether you consider the Cloud now, or later, at some point, for many software vendors, the economics of developing, shipping, supporting, maintaining, patching, and releasing upgrades to software will change. That is, those software vendors may discontinue their legacy software business model in favor of a SaaS model.

As early adopters take to the Cloud, the number of on premise customers for software vendors will decline. A small business may shift all 10 of its employees to Google Docs or Office 365, no longer buying Microsoft Office and implementing it in-house. Multiply this scenario by thousands of early adopters and it’s not hard to see the decline of the installed customer base for on premise software.

In the near term, this isn’t an issue for large software vendors as their installed base can keep revenues flowing for years even as they lose part of their large installed base. Smaller players don’t have the same advantage. Even a 10-20% hit, or one large customer, may be enough to drive them out of business or to a Cloud model, creating a domino effect.

Fast forward 3 to 5 years. Lets say 20-25% of smaller software vendors have shifted to the Cloud model.

Will this impact your business?

Even if you believe that it will not affect your business, you can see the effect will continue – as other businesses are impacted by the shift, they will have to address the issue, and make a decision whether to keep and maintain unsupported software, look for an alternative software vendor, or shift to the Cloud.

In turn, their decisions may continue to drive more business to the Cloud, more software vendors shift as their installed base erodes, more developers focus on the Cloud, and 5-8 years out it could be 25-40% of the smaller software vendors no longer shipping shrink wrapped products.

Are you impacted now?

-Tune The Future-

Twitter: @RayDePena |   LinkedIn |   Facebook |   Google+

Read the original blog entry...

More Stories By Ray DePena

Ray DePena worked at IBM for over 12 years in various senior global roles in managed hosting sales, services sales, global marketing programs (business innovation), marketing management, partner management, and global business development.
His background includes software development, computer networking, systems engineering, and IT project management. He holds an MBA in Information Systems, Marketing, and International Business from New York University’s Stern School of Business, and a BBA in Computer Systems from the City University of New York at Baruch College.

Named one of the World's 30 Most Influential Cloud Computing Bloggers in 2009, Top 50 Bloggers on Cloud Computing in 2010, and Top 100 Bloggers on Cloud Computing in 2011, he is the Founder and Editor of Amazon.com Journal,Competitive Business Innovation Journal,and Salesforce.com Journal.

He currently serves as an Industry Advisor for the Higher Education Sector on a National Science Foundation Initiative on Computational Thinking. Born and raised in New York City, Mr. DePena now lives in northern California. He can be followed on:

Twitter: @RayDePena   |   LinkedIn   |   Facebook   |   Google+

CloudEXPO Stories
As you know, enterprise IT conversation over the past year have often centered upon the open-source Kubernetes container orchestration system. In fact, Kubernetes has emerged as the key technology -- and even primary platform -- of cloud migrations for a wide variety of organizations. Kubernetes is critical to forward-looking enterprises that continue to push their IT infrastructures toward maximum functionality, scalability, and flexibility. As they do so, IT professionals are also embracing the reality of Serverless architectures, which are critical to developing and operating real-time applications and services. Serverless is particularly important as enterprises of all sizes develop and deploy Internet of Things (IoT) initiatives.
Signs of a shift in the usage of public clouds are everywhere. Previously, as organizations outgrew old IT methods, the natural answer was to try the public cloud approach; however, the public platform alone is not a complete solution. Complaints include unpredictable/escalating costs and mounting security concerns in the public cloud. Ultimately, public cloud adoption can ultimately mean a shift of IT pains instead of a resolution. That's why the move to hybrid, custom, and multi-cloud will become more and more prevalent. At the heart of this technology trend exists a custom solution to meet the needs and concerns of enterprise organizations, including compliance, security, and cost issues. The "new normal" of enterprise clients is a world of hybrid and multi-cloud solutions, and it is slowly changing the IT technology landscape. Better tools, better management, and easier adoption a...
The Japan External Trade Organization (JETRO) is a non-profit organization that provides business support services to companies expanding to Japan. With the support of JETRO's dedicated staff, clients can incorporate their business; receive visa, immigration, and HR support; find dedicated office space; identify local government subsidies; get tailored market studies; and more.
While a hybrid cloud can ease that transition, designing and deploy that hybrid cloud still offers challenges for organizations concerned about lack of available cloud skillsets within their organization. Managed service providers offer a unique opportunity to fill those gaps and get organizations of all sizes on a hybrid cloud that meets their comfort level, while delivering enhanced benefits for cost, efficiency, agility, mobility, and elasticity.
Signs of a shift in the usage of public clouds are everywhere Previously, as organizations outgrew old IT methods, the natural answer was to try the public cloud approach; however, the public platform alone is not a complete solutionThe move to hybrid, custom, and multi-cloud will become more and more prevalent At the heart of this technology trend exists a custom solution to meet the needs and concerns of these organizations, including compliance, security, and cost issues Blending Service and Deployment Models