Welcome!

@CloudExpo Authors: Elizabeth White, Yeshim Deniz, Zakia Bouachraoui, Liz McMillan, Pat Romanski

Related Topics: @CloudExpo, Java IoT, Microservices Expo, Containers Expo Blog, Release Management

@CloudExpo: Article

Cloud Transactions: Timing as a Service (TaaS)

Getting a single source for timing would strengthen cloud computing to a whole new level of platform for enterprise applications

Many organizations are starting to look at cloud computing as a universal solution, but there are many applications that cannot be considered unless the framework of cloud computing includes Timing as a Service (TaaS)© as part of its fabric. Mission-critical applications require security measures including encryption, monitoring, and redundancy/resiliency, but that is not enough.

As stated in an earlier article: (http://cloudcomputing.sys-con.com/node/2164323 )

If cloud computing is going to spread to more mission critical-type applications, it needs to get more exact and accurate when it comes to transaction-based applications. Trying to keep everything in a structured framework is going to require a more rigorous network infrastructure that includes timing down to milliseconds, if not nanoseconds.

Financial transactions that can already be generated by "robotic traders" are being sent across networks at a very rapid rate. When you have thousands upon thousands of transactions being generated in a few seconds, you need to be able to sort them out if something happens and you want to replicate (or re-construct) the event.

A perfect example of this was the Dow Drop of 1,000 points back in May 2010. They never had a good explanation of it, because they could not re-construct the event that triggered the 1,000 point drop.

In order to be able to reconstruct thousands of transactions flying out in microseconds, the timing of the network would have to come from one source and be able to be broken down into nanoseconds in order to sort out each transaction to a unique time element with a unique time stamp.

Mission-Critical Applications? Timing Is a Must
Currently, many mission-critical applications are not viewed as a possibility for cloud computing, but in order for them to have any chance of being implemented, "timing as a service" must be part of the infrastructure that they would reside on.

With this type of capability, a whole new set of applications could be included in product offerings from cloud computing vendors. The trouble is that once a company offers this, it needs to ensure it has enough solid technology support people who understand the intricacies of mission-critical applications.

When you think of bulletproof networks, you think of the old Bell System with its layers of technical support and unlimited money to build central office mock-ups that would be used to replicate any field problems that were then diagnosed by well-trained experts. As they say, "those were the days."

Some have compared the evolution of using early electrical power in companies in the industrial age to the use of computers in today's companies. At that time, companies originally had their own electrical power generator within their building, but then they opted to get their power from outside sources and get rid of the internal power sources.

Some refer to cloud computing as a new "utility" today, but that is a little premature. Before it can be considered as a utility, it has to have a much stronger platform that is bulletproof.

One of the problems the old companies in the industrial age initially had in converting from an internal power source to one from an outside source (power company) was the measurement of power they were actually getting. Were they being charged an appropriate fee or were they getting ripped off?

Accurate measurement and metering was a must for everyone that wanted to get their power from an outside source. The same issues apply to computing. If we put an application up into the cloud, we have to make sure we can feel comfortable with its execution and accuracy.

Timing from a single source is one of the missing elements that cloud computing needs to incorporate into its fabric in order to provide a solid platform for enterprise mission-critical applications.

•   •   •

Copyright 2012 - James Carlini

More Stories By James Carlini

James Carlini, MBA, a certified Infrastructure Consultant, keynote speaker and former award-winning Adjunct Professor at Northwestern University, has advised on mission-critical networks. Clients include the Chicago Mercantile Exchange, GLOBEX, and City of Chicago’s 911 Center. An expert witness in civil and federal courts on network infrastructure, he has worked with AT&T, Sprint and others.

Follow daily Carlini-isms at www.twitter.com/JAMESCARLINI

Comments (0)

Share your thoughts on this story.

Add your comment
You must be signed in to add a comment. Sign-in | Register

In accordance with our Comment Policy, we encourage comments that are on topic, relevant and to-the-point. We will remove comments that include profanity, personal attacks, racial slurs, threats of violence, or other inappropriate material that violates our Terms and Conditions, and will block users who make repeated violations. We ask all readers to expect diversity of opinion and to treat one another with dignity and respect.


CloudEXPO Stories
At CloudEXPO Silicon Valley, June 24-26, 2019, Digital Transformation (DX) is a major focus with expanded DevOpsSUMMIT and FinTechEXPO programs within the DXWorldEXPO agenda. Successful transformation requires a laser focus on being data-driven and on using all the tools available that enable transformation if they plan to survive over the long term. A total of 88% of Fortune 500 companies from a generation ago are now out of business. Only 12% still survive. Similar percentages are found throughout enterprises of all sizes.
Darktrace is the world's leading AI company for cyber security. Created by mathematicians from the University of Cambridge, Darktrace's Enterprise Immune System is the first non-consumer application of machine learning to work at scale, across all network types, from physical, virtualized, and cloud, through to IoT and industrial control systems. Installed as a self-configuring cyber defense platform, Darktrace continuously learns what is ‘normal' for all devices and users, updating its understanding as the environment changes.
AI and machine learning disruption for Enterprises started happening in the areas such as IT operations management (ITOPs) and Cloud management and SaaS apps. In 2019 CIOs will see disruptive solutions for Cloud & Devops, AI/ML driven IT Ops and Cloud Ops. Customers want AI-driven multi-cloud operations for monitoring, detection, prevention of disruptions. Disruptions cause revenue loss, unhappy users, impacts brand reputation etc.
Apptio fuels digital business transformation. Technology leaders use Apptio's machine learning to analyze and plan their technology spend so they can invest in products that increase the speed of business and deliver innovation. With Apptio, they translate raw costs, utilization, and billing data into business-centric views that help their organization optimize spending, plan strategically, and drive digital strategy that funds growth of the business. Technology leaders can gather instant recommendations that result in up to 30% saving on cloud services. For more information, please visit www.Apptio.com.
OpsRamp is an enterprise IT operation platform provided by US-based OpsRamp, Inc. It provides SaaS services through support for increasingly complex cloud and hybrid computing environments from system operation to service management. The OpsRamp platform is a SaaS-based, multi-tenant solution that enables enterprise IT organizations and cloud service providers like JBS the flexibility and control they need to manage and monitor today's hybrid, multi-cloud infrastructure, applications, and workloads, including Microsoft Azure. We are excited to partner with JBS and look forward to a long and successful relationship.