Welcome!

@CloudExpo Authors: Liz McMillan, Elizabeth White, Pat Romanski, Yeshim Deniz, Zakia Bouachraoui

Related Topics: Government Cloud, Microservices Expo, Containers Expo Blog, Cognitive Computing , Agile Computing, @CloudExpo, Cloud Security

Government Cloud: Blog Feed Post

Cloud Archiving and Compliance

Clients like governments and the finance industry have extensive requirements for archiving and e-discovery

Our Cloud Archiving and Compliance best practices will define a maturity model for this hugely important segment within the industry.

It will also produce a best practices white paper, tailored to meet the needs of the NIST Business Use Case that defines the specific requirements for this functionality,  the FAA E-Discovery scenario (11-page PDF).

It will also describe a response to the general best practices defined in the recent CIO.gov document: Best practices for ITaaS, which also describes eDiscovery requirements. Download the 44-page PDF here.

Cloud Archiving Managed Services
This is such a hugely important area for Cloud Providers to develop new services because of the double impact it represents.

First there is the simple facet of the business opportunity. Clients like governments and the finance industry have extensive requirements for archiving and e-discovery.

Secondly and the accelerating factor is that the biggest hold up to Cloud adoption is the lack of maturity in this area. Typically the fears all centre on issues like data residency, where is the data hosted, and what protections are in place to ensure this data is not tampered with and so on.

These are requirements that archiving solutions deal with straight off the bat.

The Gartner Magic Quadrant places vendors like HP (Autonomy), IBM and Symantec as the leaders in this space, but this is a focus on the overall broad category of enterprise archiving, meaning it includes traditional on-site systems too.

Where the real challenge and opportunity is presented is how these types of capabilities can be absorbed into Cloud hosting environments, challenges that are well described in this white paper from another of the vendors Proofpoint: Cloud Computing and eDiscovery.

They describe critical points like:

Cloud computing makes IT operations fast and nimble, but it doesn’t necessarily make ESI easier to discover or legal holds easier to enforce. On the contrary, cloud computing can make legal holds and ESI searches more complex, time-consuming, and difficult. The vast majority of cloud providers would be unable to satisfy the stringent security, privacy, and data access requirements of corporate counsel and other stakeholders responsible for managing legal risk exposure.

They are exactly right on this, which is a blunt explanation of why Cloud adoption is still very low despite the huge hype. There`s your answer.

Also Proofpoint describe the solution, and the associated opportunity for Cloud Providers:

Enterprise IT departments need guidance for deploying eDiscovery applications and for crafting Service Level Agreements (SLAs) with cloud service providers, so that new cloud computing initiatives don’t undermine the enterprise’s investments in eDiscovery.

If Cloud Providers do this they will not only open up a specific product segment, Cloud Archiving, but they will also alleviate Cloud adoption fears in general and open the floodgates for broader adoption of all Cloud apps.

This is why, in my opinion, Cloud Archiving is the single most important product area for Cloud Providers to invest in.

Cloud Archiving – Service specifications

For a taste of these market opportunities we can review a number of related industry initiatives.

Managing Government Records - President Obama recently declared the ‘Managing Government Records‘ initiative , to better use Cloud technologies to perform Information Management and achieve Open Government. Canada also recently announced a similar initiative, to build a ‘GC Docs’ portal that publishes all of their records.

The NIST Business Use Case details the required service specifications, begun with this high level introduction and overview:

“The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) is examining how to implement cloud-based e-discovery and Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) processes for email. The system must be able to perform discovery in both its in-house email implementation (Lotus Notes) but also in cloud-based email systems. The system will also be used to manage content for compliance purposes, and will serve as an archive of FAA messaging content.

The long-run goal is to support four primary functions: e-discovery, electronic records management, FOIA, and privacy. These four processes have similar needs and capabilities, including searching business applications, document repositories, email (including calendar, contacts, tasks, etc.) and instant messages, and distributed storage (both internal and external) for electronically stored information (ESI) meeting defined criteria.

The focus of this business use case is the processes and systems required to respond to e-discovery and FOIA requests as they pertain to email message data and other supporting data such as calendar entries, tasks, attachments, etc. that are produced and processed by the FAA’s traditional and cloud email messaging systems.”

Our Cloud Archiving best practices program will detail how Cloud Providers can develop products in this area to meet these requirements and opportunities.

Read the original blog entry...

More Stories By Cloud Best Practices Network

The Cloud Best Practices Network is an expert community of leading Cloud pioneers. Follow our best practice blogs at http://CloudBestPractices.net

CloudEXPO Stories
Discussions of cloud computing have evolved in recent years from a focus on specific types of cloud, to a world of hybrid cloud, and to a world dominated by the APIs that make today's multi-cloud environments and hybrid clouds possible. In this Power Panel at 17th Cloud Expo, moderated by Conference Chair Roger Strukhoff, panelists addressed the importance of customers being able to use the specific technologies they need, through environments and ecosystems that expose their APIs to make true change and transformation possible.
In an era of historic innovation fueled by unprecedented access to data and technology, the low cost and risk of entering new markets has leveled the playing field for business. Today, any ambitious innovator can easily introduce a new application or product that can reinvent business models and transform the client experience. In their Day 2 Keynote at 19th Cloud Expo, Mercer Rowe, IBM Vice President of Strategic Alliances, and Raejeanne Skillern, Intel Vice President of Data Center Group and GM, discussed how clients in this new era of innovation can apply data, technology, plus human ingenuity to springboard to advance new business value and opportunities.
With more than 30 Kubernetes solutions in the marketplace, it's tempting to think Kubernetes and the vendor ecosystem has solved the problem of operationalizing containers at scale or of automatically managing the elasticity of the underlying infrastructure that these solutions need to be truly scalable. Far from it. There are at least six major pain points that companies experience when they try to deploy and run Kubernetes in their complex environments. In this presentation, the speaker will detail these pain points and explain how cloud can address them.
The current age of digital transformation means that IT organizations must adapt their toolset to cover all digital experiences, beyond just the end users’. Today’s businesses can no longer focus solely on the digital interactions they manage with employees or customers; they must now contend with non-traditional factors. Whether it's the power of brand to make or break a company, the need to monitor across all locations 24/7, or the ability to proactively resolve issues, companies must adapt to the new world.
In his session at 20th Cloud Expo, Scott Davis, CTO of Embotics, discussed how automation can provide the dynamic management required to cost-effectively deliver microservices and container solutions at scale. He also discussed how flexible automation is the key to effectively bridging and seamlessly coordinating both IT and developer needs for component orchestration across disparate clouds – an increasingly important requirement at today’s multi-cloud enterprise.