Welcome!

@CloudExpo Authors: Pat Romanski, Yeshim Deniz, Elizabeth White, Liz McMillan, Zakia Bouachraoui

Related Topics: @CloudExpo, Microservices Expo, Containers Expo Blog, Agile Computing, Apache, Cloud Security

@CloudExpo: Blog Feed Post

Secure Data in Flight

Fat apps combined with SSL Everywhere strategies suggest a need for more powerful processing in the application delivery tier

Fat apps combined with SSL Everywhere strategies suggest a need for more powerful processing in the application delivery tier

According to Netcraft, who tracks these kinds of things, SSL usage has doubled from 2008 and 2011. That's a good thing, as it indicates an upswing in adherence to security best practices that say "SSL Everywhere" just makes good sense.

The downside is overhead, which despite improvements in processing power and support for specific cryptographic processing in hardware still exists. How much overhead is more dependent on the size of data and the specific cryptographic algorithms chosen. SSL is one of those protocols that has different overhead and impacts on performance based on the size of the data. With data less than 32kb, overhead is primarily incurred during session negotiation. After 32kb, bulk encryption becomes the issue.

The problem is that a server is likely going to feel both, because it has to negotiate the session and the average response size for web applications today is well above the 32kb threshold, with most pages serving up 41kb in HTML alone – that's not counting scripts, images, and other objects.


It turns out that about 70% of the total processing time of an HTTPS transaction is spent in SSL processing. As a result, a more detailed understanding of the key overheads within SSL processing was required. By presenting a detailed description of the anatomy of SSL processing, we showed that the major overhead incurred during SSL processing lies in the session negotiation phase when small amount of data are transferred (as in banking transactions).  On the other hand, when the data exchanged in the session crosses over 32K bytes, the bulk data encryption phase becomes important.

-- Anatomy and Performance of SSL Processing [pdf]

An often overlooked benefit of improvements in processing power is that just as it helps improve processing of SSL on servers, so too do such improvements help boost the processing of SSL on intermediate devices such as application delivery controllers. On such devices, where complete control over the network and operating system stacks is possible, even greater performance benefits are derived from advances in processing power. Those benefits are also seen in other processing on devices such as compression and intelligent traffic management.

But also a benefit of more processing power and improvements in core bus architectures is the ability to do more with less, which enables consolidation of application delivery services on to a shared infrastructure platform like BIG-IP. From traffic management to acceleration, from network to application firewall services, from DNS to secure remote access – hardware improvements from the processor to the NIC to the switching backplane offer increased performance as well as increased utilization across multiple functions which, in and of itself, improves performance by eliminating multiple hops in the application delivery chain. Each hop removed improves performance because the latency associated with managing flows and connections is eliminated.

Introducing BIG-IP 4200v

The BIG-IP 4200v hardware platform takes advantage of this and the result is better performance with a lower power footprint (80+ Gold Certified power supplies) that improves security across all managed applications. Consolidation further reduces power consumption by eliminating redundant services and 4200vestablishes a strategic point of control through which multiple initiatives can be realized including unified secure remote access, an enhanced security posture, and increased server utilization by leveraging offload services at the application delivery tier.

A single, unified application delivery platform offers many benefits, not the least of which is visibility into all operational components: security, performance, and availability.

BIG-IP 4200v supports provisioning of BIG-IP Analytics (AVR) in conjunction with other BIG-IP service modules, enabling breadth and depth of traffic management analytics across all shared services.

This latest hardware platform provides mid-size enterprises and service providers with the performance and capacity required to implement more comprehensive application delivery services that address operational risk.

Read the original blog entry...

More Stories By Lori MacVittie

Lori MacVittie is responsible for education and evangelism of application services available across F5’s entire product suite. Her role includes authorship of technical materials and participation in a number of community-based forums and industry standards organizations, among other efforts. MacVittie has extensive programming experience as an application architect, as well as network and systems development and administration expertise. Prior to joining F5, MacVittie was an award-winning Senior Technology Editor at Network Computing Magazine, where she conducted product research and evaluation focused on integration with application and network architectures, and authored articles on a variety of topics aimed at IT professionals. Her most recent area of focus included SOA-related products and architectures. She holds a B.S. in Information and Computing Science from the University of Wisconsin at Green Bay, and an M.S. in Computer Science from Nova Southeastern University.

CloudEXPO Stories
@DevOpsSummit at Cloud Expo, taking place November 12-13 in New York City, NY, is co-located with 22nd international CloudEXPO | first international DXWorldEXPO and will feature technical sessions from a rock star conference faculty and the leading industry players in the world. The widespread success of cloud computing is driving the DevOps revolution in enterprise IT. Now as never before, development teams must communicate and collaborate in a dynamic, 24/7/365 environment. There is no time to wait for long development cycles that produce software that is obsolete at launch. DevOps may be disruptive, but it is essential.
Sanjeev Sharma Joins November 11-13, 2018 @DevOpsSummit at @CloudEXPO New York Faculty. Sanjeev Sharma is an internationally known DevOps and Cloud Transformation thought leader, technology executive, and author. Sanjeev's industry experience includes tenures as CTO, Technical Sales leader, and Cloud Architect leader. As an IBM Distinguished Engineer, Sanjeev is recognized at the highest levels of IBM's core of technical leaders.
DXWorldEXPO LLC announced today that Kevin Jackson joined the faculty of CloudEXPO's "10-Year Anniversary Event" which will take place on November 11-13, 2018 in New York City. Kevin L. Jackson is a globally recognized cloud computing expert and Founder/Author of the award winning "Cloud Musings" blog. Mr. Jackson has also been recognized as a "Top 100 Cybersecurity Influencer and Brand" by Onalytica (2015), a Huffington Post "Top 100 Cloud Computing Experts on Twitter" (2013) and a "Top 50 Cloud Computing Blogger for IT Integrators" by CRN (2015). Mr. Jackson's professional career includes service in the US Navy Space Systems Command, Vice President J.P. Morgan Chase, Worldwide Sales Executive for IBM and NJVC Vice President, Cloud Services. He is currently part of a team responsible for onboarding mission applications to the US Intelligence Community cloud computing environment (IC ...
Charles Araujo is an industry analyst, internationally recognized authority on the Digital Enterprise and author of The Quantum Age of IT: Why Everything You Know About IT is About to Change. As Principal Analyst with Intellyx, he writes, speaks and advises organizations on how to navigate through this time of disruption. He is also the founder of The Institute for Digital Transformation and a sought after keynote speaker. He has been a regular contributor to both InformationWeek and CIO Insight and has been quoted or published in Time, CIO, Computerworld, USA Today and Forbes.
When talking IoT we often focus on the devices, the sensors, the hardware itself. The new smart appliances, the new smart or self-driving cars (which are amalgamations of many ‘things'). When we are looking at the world of IoT, we should take a step back, look at the big picture. What value are these devices providing. IoT is not about the devices, its about the data consumed and generated. The devices are tools, mechanisms, conduits. This paper discusses the considerations when dealing with the massive amount of information associated with these devices. Ed presented sought out sessions at CloudEXPO Silicon Valley 2017 and CloudEXPO New York 2017. He is a regular contributor to Cloud Computing Journal.