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Citrix Expands Investment in Linux and Open Cloud With Linux Foundation Gold Membership

BARCELONA, SPAIN -- (Marketwire) -- 11/05/12 -- The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit organization dedicated to accelerating the growth of Linux, today announced that Citrix has expanded its investment in Linux and open source cloud computing by upgrading to Gold membership. The company previously was a Silver member of organization.

Citrix is a committed supporter of open source software and is a significant participant in both Xen and Apache CloudStack. Both projects provide the underpinnings for some of the world's largest cloud computing environments. The Xen hypervisor is a virtualization technology that enables server virtualization, a critical capability for cloud computing. Apache CloudStack software orchestrates virtualized environments so that they can work as an elastic compute environment. Many of the world's leading telecommunications companies have chosen Citrix CloudPlatform™, powered by Apache CloudStack and XenServer, as the foundation for their next generation cloud computing offerings.

Developers, DevOps professionals, end users and vendors are looking to the collaborative development model to accelerate cloud computing deployments and advance technology innovation in this area. As a leader in open cloud software, Citrix is prioritizing investments in the open development model. Its increased participation in Linux Foundation Labs, workgroups, events and other activities will help Citrix foster greater collaboration and participation in the open cloud and maximize its investment in Linux and open source software.

The Linux Foundation provides a neutral environment where work on the open cloud can be advanced across projects and companies. It hosted the industry's first CloudOpen (http://events.linuxfoundation.org/events/cloudopen) event In August, bringing together vendors, developers and users to discuss topics including strategy, security and systems. More than 150 companies are members of the organization, participating at one of three levels: Platinum, Gold or Silver membership. Currently there are seven Platinum members and 17 Gold members.

"Cloud computing represents a significant shift in the way technologies users consume IT services and how developers build those services. Linux and the collaborative development are paving the way for this shift," said Jim Zemlin, executive director of the Linux Foundation. "Citrix is taking an important leadership role in the open cloud by prioritizing Linux and collaborative development for advancing cloud computing industry-wide."

CloudStack is an open source cloud computing platform for creating, managing and deploying infrastructure services. The open source Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS) platform is a key part of the Citrix strategy for competing in the future of enterprise computing. The company acquired the platform from Cloud.com in 2011 and earlier this year contributed the entire code base to the Apache Software Foundation.

"The Linux Foundation provides a valued environment for collaborating across projects, companies and industries," said Mark R. Hinkle, Senior Director Cloud Computing Communities, Citrix. "Upgrading our membership level and increasing our investment in Linux and open source cloud computing are natural next steps as we work to advance cloud technologies to address the challenges facing enterprise users today."

Citrix is a Gold Sponsor of LinuxCon Europe, taking place in Barcelona, Spain November 5-7, 2012. Citrix executives and Apache CloudStack project members will also be speaking at the event. For more information or to register for the event, please visit the Linux Foundation events website.

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About The Linux Foundation
The Linux Foundation is a nonprofit consortium dedicated to fostering the growth of Linux. Founded in 2000, the organization sponsors the work of Linux creator Linus Torvalds and promotes, protects and advances the Linux operating system by marshaling the resources of its members and the open source development community. The Linux Foundation provides a neutral forum for collaboration and education by hosting Linux conferences, including LinuxCon, and generating original Linux research, Linux videos and content that advances the understanding of the Linux platform. Its web properties, including Linux.com, reach approximately two million people per month. The organization also provides extensive Linux training opportunities that feature the Linux kernel community's leading experts as instructors. Follow The Linux Foundation on Twitter.

Trademarks: The Linux Foundation, Linux Standard Base, MeeGo and Yocto Project are trademarks of The Linux Foundation. Linux is a trademark of Linus Torvalds.

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Media Contact
Jennifer Cloer
The Linux Foundation
503-867-2304
[email protected]

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