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ACTIVE Network Launches ACTIVE Access™ Developer Center

ACTIVE Network, Inc. (NYSE: ACTV), the leader in cloud-based Activity and Participant Management™ (APM), announced the launch of its enhanced developer center, ACTIVE Access, which brings together all aspects of ACTIVE Network’s distribution offerings in a single, user-friendly site. ACTIVE’s core Activity API allows software developers to get inspired, get rewarded and get paid for creating custom apps which utilize the robust, global inventory of events and activities listed on ACTIVE Network’s online media property, ACTIVE.com.

ACTIVE Access offers developers a centralized hub where they can:

  • Gain 24/7 access to resources, APIs as well as article and search widgets;
  • Monetize applications and traffic through an integrated affiliate program;
  • Get answers from a comprehensive help center that includes FAQs, user forums and a blog;
  • Showcase their work and win prizes for innovative uses of the ACTIVE.com API.

“Since first launching our original developer center in 2009, ACTIVE’s public APIs have generated 255 million API calls and 121% year-over-year growth in developer accounts accessing our platform,” said Kristin Carroll, vice president of corporate and consumer marketing at ACTIVE Network. “We are excited to provide a platform for developers from around the world to more broadly distribute activities on behalf of the over 50,000 organizers we power. Ultimately, our goal is to provide access to activities anywhere and increase participation.”

ACTIVE Network has steadily grown its affiliate program with over 200 distribution partners to date including well-known brands such as espnW, Eventful, Fitness Magazine, PGA.com, and Prevention. ACTIVE Access supports desktop and mobile applications across endurance sports, community recreation events, summer camps, camping, golf tee times, business events, and more. ACTIVE Network is working to add new API offerings that will be available through ACTIVE Access for developers across a range of markets.

To learn more about ACTIVE Access and how you can get involved, visit http://developer.ACTIVE.com/.

About ACTIVE Network

ACTIVE Network (NYSE: ACTV) is on a mission to make the world a more active place. With deep expertise in Activity and Participant Management™ (APM), our ActiveWorks® cloud technology helps organizations transform and grow their businesses. We do this through technology solutions that power the world’s activities and through online destinations such as ACTIVE.com® that connect people with the things they love to do. Serving over 50,000 global business customers and driving over 80 million transactions annually, we help organizations get participants, manage their events and build communities. ACTIVE Network is headquartered in San Diego, California and has over 30 offices worldwide. Learn more at ACTIVEnetwork.com or ACTIVE.com and engage with us on Twitter @ACTIVEnetwork, @ACTIVE and on Facebook.

About Forward-Looking Statements

The Active Network, Inc. cautions you that the statements included in this press release that are not a description of historical facts are forward-looking statements within the meaning of the federal securities laws. Any such statements are subject to substantial risks and uncertainties, and actual results may differ materially from those expressed in these forward-looking statements. More detailed information about The Active Network, Inc. and the risks and uncertainties that may affect the realization of these forward-looking statements is set forth in its filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC). These filings may be read free of charge on the SEC's website at www.sec.gov. You are cautioned not to place undue reliance on these forward-looking statements, which speak only as of the date hereof. All forward-looking statements are qualified in their entirety by this cautionary statement and The Active Network, Inc. undertakes no obligation to revise or update this press release to reflect events or circumstances after the date hereof.

© 2012 The Active Network, Inc. All rights reserved. ACTIVE.com and ActiveWorks are registered trademarks of The Active Network, Inc. ACTIVE Network, ACTIVE Access and Activity and Participant Management are trademarks of The Active Network, Inc. All other trademarks are the property of their respective owners.

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