Click here to close now.

Welcome!

Cloud Expo Authors: Liz McMillan, AppDynamics Blog, Kelly Murphy, Elizabeth White, Pat Romanski

Blog Feed Post

5 reasons your website might slow down this holiday season (or anytime)

The National Retail Federation (NRF) predicts that this year’s holiday sales will increase 4.1 percent to $586.1 billion. But here’s a wrinkle in the data that nobody really records: The companies that are making money are those that have fast, responsive websites. Companies with slow websites won’t be cashing in this season.

In fact, a Kissmetrics report on shopping cart abandonment found that 40 percent of people abandon a website that takes more than three seconds to load, and a less forgiving group of almost 50 percent of users expect a website to load in two seconds or less. This is just the latest in a slew of similar studies that have been produced since the dawn of the e-commerce era that concludes website performance has a direct correlation to revenue performance.

So what can you do to ensure your web pages load in two seconds or less? Avoid the following faux pas. These are the most common problems we see that slow e-commerce sites down to the point of depressing sales.

1. Unforeseen traffic spikes. Heavy traffic is one of the most obvious reasons a website slows down, and most IT departments provision for this. But what if IT doesn’t know what’s coming, or when it’s coming? A surge of users to a site for a specific reason that IT doesn’t know about is a big risk that is easily preventable.

Historically, there’s always been delineation between IT and marketing. To help bridge this gap, many organizations have hired a chief web officer (CWO), who oversees an organization’s web presence, including all Internet and intranet traffic. The CWO helps communicate marketing’s website performance needs to the IT department in enough time for them to prepare for any big promotional events.

As soon as marketing suspects that the website might receive heavier-than-normal traffic, IT and marketing should start working together on a schedule that will help avoid any last minute problems. The most important thing marketing should be communicating is how many users they are expecting and how long they expect core page load to take.

While not all situations are the same, don’t despair if your website goes down during a time when you expected to rake in huge online sales. There are a few things you can do to remedy the situation. A common strategy is to throw more bandwidth or more CPU at the site to resolve the issues — but it’ll cost you. Before doing this, organizations should conduct a quick cost-benefit analysis.

A business with an overloaded site will need to decide if the revenue they will bring in from their site staying up will break even with or surpass the amount they put into extra bandwidth or CPU.

2. Inadequate infrastructure and code base measurement and testing. This problem can be avoided during the software development lifecycle by using tools that realistically measure your website’s performance from an external perspective, as well as having benchmarks associated with testing. During the software development lifecycle, the following factors affect your site’s speed:

  • Where the infrastructure is located geographically. If you’re selling to the Asian market but planning to host your infrastructure in Amazon East, you’re going to experience latency delays right off the bat.
  • Whether to cache or use CDNs. There is a subtle difference between the two, but front-end caching will help you avoid taxing your web servers, something that will cause your website to slow down. Front-end caching allows the cache version of the data to sit right in front of the web server and can be done relatively inexpensively with freeware technology. CDNs will come at a more significant cost, but will ensure localized delivery of content, saving you the latency that networks might provide.
  • Image size. If the graphics on your site are not optimized and efficient, the page will take longer to download. You need a way to analyze graphical development throughout your site, find those that are suboptimal, and redeploy them.
  • Whether you are using standalone or shared hosting environments. Standalone services allow for improved control and understanding of your environment and performance. A shared environment is like an apartment complex — you don’t know much about your neighbors or how their application/environment could be affecting your performance. While shared environments might be cheaper in the short-term, they could very well cost more over time.
  • Whether you are using virtualized instances or traditional servers. Depending on the application requirements, virtualized instances could be more convenient for deployment and backup purposes. However, they could cause performance issues. As a result, evaluate the overhead associated with your application on a virtualized instance versus a non-virtualized environment.
  • What type of database you chose. Whether it’s MySQL or Cassandra, SQL vs. NoSQL, we repeatedly see underutilized or misconfigured setups that cause performance significant issues. Additionally, we see organizations make interesting database solution selections that don’t take into consideration real benefits. Often a database is chosen based solely on the available in-house or outsourced expertise rather than the actual needs of the application.
  • What type of OS you chose. Costs and technical expertise are the two most common drivers behind operating system architecture and design. But the success of the OS ultimately comes down to optimization. Fine-tuning can be performed according to best practices; however, running a load test against your environment will allow you to truly optimize it.
  • If this site will be hosted in your own data center, co-located, or in a cloud hosting environment. Many organizations today begin by hosting their application in the cloud for rapid deployment, short term wins, and proof of concept to investors. As the application grows or the user base increases, organizations often will consider and migrate to their own data center or at least out of the cloud. There are appealing solutions today that allow for applications to continue to scale in an effort to mimic many popular cloud environments. Regardless of the environment, it’s imperative to learn your performance numbers and ensure that you meet or exceed performance metrics as you migrate.

3. Lack of maintenance. Conducting incremental performance tests with each new update or change to your environment might sound like a lot of extra work for your IT department. But, there are several subtle efficiencies you can perform that solve multiple problems. Spriting, for example, combines multiple images or CSS files.

You can continue to tweak your environment by optimizing your code with each update of the site. Implementing cache management will regulate which and how many objects to keep in memory. Regular patch management maintenance can prevent memory leaks within the code base that cause slowness.

Most organizations find that their maintenance works best on a regular schedule, and is performed whether the environment has changed or not. Microsoft, for example, has Patch Tuesday. Every Tuesday is dedicated to making sure their apps are updated with the latest and greatest patches, as well as reviewing the code base to figure out how to best optimize as environments change.

4. Inability to scale. A lot of organizations will develop sites that are not built to scale to the level they need, even though this is such a fundamental component of the software development lifecycle. We talk to a lot of web developers whose strategy is to simply buy more resources — hardware/software, bandwidth, CPU, memory, servers, etc. — than they need, and then assume that the extra will help them handle any heavy traffic that comes down the pike.

A more practical strategy (that will also save you money) is to take the time to develop an adaptive environment that you know can scale. Again, the sure-fire way to avoid this is to test and test often, so that you know every part of the stack can scale. And I mean to test everything — the front and back end web servers, databases, and application servers.

5. Quality measurements. Some IT teams are afraid to shine a light on their own work for fear of exposing errors they might have made during the development process. This is a common internal, political problem for most organizations.

The bottom line is that if the website is slow, revenue is lost, so it needs to be confronted. If an IT team finds errors in its website after it goes live, they are often hesitant to draw attention to it right away, or even at all.

It’s important to say that I don’t believe internal IT teams can’t detect errors or are incapable of fixing them. All I’m saying is that our customers are often relieved to receive help from a third party that will objectively identify errors and are guaranteed to have the time and resources to fix them.

How much of this holiday season’s expected $586 billion will you be generating? Hopefully, a lot. Especially if you take the time now to pay attention to your website’s performance and do what it takes to make sure your customers get the best experience. Yes, the competition for customers will be fierce, but sticking to these five simple tips will keep your website up and running through January.

Read the original blog entry...

More Stories By Sven Hammar

Sven Hammar is Co-Founder and CEO of Apica. In 2005, he had the vision of starting a new SaaS company focused on application testing and performance. Today, that concept is Apica, the third IT company I’ve helped found in my career.

Before Apica, he co-founded and launched Celo Commuication, a security company built around PKI (e-ID) solutions. He served as CEO for three years and helped grow the company from five people to 85 people in two years. Right before co-founding Apica, he served as the Vice President of Marketing Bank and Finance at the security company Gemplus (GEMP).

Sven received his masters of science in industrial economics from the Institute of Technology (LitH) at Linköping University. When not working, you can find Sven golfing, working out, or with family and friends.

@CloudExpo Stories
The recent trends like cloud computing, social, mobile and Internet of Things are forcing enterprises to modernize in order to compete in the competitive globalized markets. However, enterprises are approaching newer technologies with a more silo-ed way, gaining only sub optimal benefits. The Modern Enterprise model is presented as a newer way to think of enterprise IT, which takes a more holistic approach to embracing modern technologies.
There is little doubt that Big Data solutions will have an increasing role in the Enterprise IT mainstream over time. 8th International Big Data Expo, co-located with 17th International Cloud Expo - to be held November 3-5, 2015, at the Santa Clara Convention Center in Santa Clara, CA - has announced its Call for Papers is open. As advanced data storage, access and analytics technologies aimed at handling high-volume and/or fast moving data all move center stage, aided by the cloud computing bo...
Every day we read jaw-dropping stats on the explosion of data. We allocate significant resources to harness and better understand it. We build businesses around it. But we’ve only just begun. For big payoffs in Big Data, CIOs are turning to cognitive computing. Cognitive computing’s ability to securely extract insights, understand natural language, and get smarter each time it’s used is the next, logical step for Big Data.
There's no doubt that the Internet of Things is driving the next wave of innovation. Google has spent billions over the past few months vacuuming up companies that specialize in smart appliances and machine learning. Already, Philips light bulbs, Audi automobiles, and Samsung washers and dryers can communicate with and be controlled from mobile devices. To take advantage of the opportunities the Internet of Things brings to your business, you'll want to start preparing now.
Enterprises are fast realizing the importance of integrating SaaS/Cloud applications, API and on-premises data and processes, to unleash hidden value. This webinar explores how managers can use a Microservice-centric approach to aggressively tackle the unexpected new integration challenges posed by proliferation of cloud, mobile, social and big data projects. Industry analyst and SOA expert Jason Bloomberg will strip away the hype from microservices, and clearly identify their advantages and d...
In a world of ever-accelerating business cycles and fast-changing client expectations, the cloud increasingly serves as a growth engine and a path to new business models. Dynamic clouds enable businesses to continuously reinvent themselves, adapting their business processes, their service and software delivery and their operations to achieve speed-to-market and quick response to customer feedback. As the cloud evolves, the industry has multiple competing cloud technologies, offering on-premises ...
The 5th International DevOps Summit, co-located with 17th International Cloud Expo – being held November 3-5, 2015, at the Santa Clara Convention Center in Santa Clara, CA – announces that its Call for Papers is open. Born out of proven success in agile development, cloud computing, and process automation, DevOps is a macro trend you cannot afford to miss. From showcase success stories from early adopters and web-scale businesses, DevOps is expanding to organizations of all sizes, including the...
Over the years, a variety of methodologies have emerged in order to overcome the challenges related to project constraints. The successful use of each methodology seems highly context-dependent. However, communication seems to be the common denominator of the many challenges that project management methodologies intend to resolve. In this respect, Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) can be viewed as powerful tools for managing projects. Few research papers have focused on the way...
As the world moves from DevOps to NoOps, application deployment to the cloud ought to become a lot simpler. However, applications have been architected with a much tighter coupling than it needs to be which makes deployment in different environments and migration between them harder. The microservices architecture, which is the basis of many new age distributed systems such as OpenStack, Netflix and so on is at the heart of CloudFoundry – a complete developer-oriented Platform as a Service (PaaS...
The OpenStack cloud operating system includes Trove, a database abstraction layer. Rather than applications connecting directly to a specific type of database, they connect to Trove, which in turn connects to one or more specific databases. One target database is Postgres Plus Cloud Database, which includes its own RESTful API. Trove was originally developed around MySQL, whose interfaces are significantly less complicated than those of the Postgres cloud database. In his session at 16th Cloud...
SAP is delivering break-through innovation combined with fantastic user experience powered by the market-leading in-memory technology, SAP HANA. In his General Session at 15th Cloud Expo, Thorsten Leiduck, VP ISVs & Digital Commerce, SAP, discussed how SAP and partners provide cloud and hybrid cloud solutions as well as real-time Big Data offerings that help companies of all sizes and industries run better. SAP launched an application challenge to award the most innovative SAP HANA and SAP HANA...
With major technology companies and startups seriously embracing IoT strategies, now is the perfect time to attend @ThingsExpo in Silicon Valley. Learn what is going on, contribute to the discussions, and ensure that your enterprise is as "IoT-Ready" as it can be! Internet of @ThingsExpo, taking place Nov 3-5, 2015, at the Santa Clara Convention Center in Santa Clara, CA, is co-located with 17th Cloud Expo and will feature technical sessions from a rock star conference faculty and the leading in...
P2P RTC will impact the landscape of communications, shifting from traditional telephony style communications models to OTT (Over-The-Top) cloud assisted & PaaS (Platform as a Service) communication services. The P2P shift will impact many areas of our lives, from mobile communication, human interactive web services, RTC and telephony infrastructure, user federation, security and privacy implications, business costs, and scalability. In his session at @ThingsExpo, Robin Raymond, Chief Architect...
The widespread success of cloud computing is driving the DevOps revolution in enterprise IT. Now as never before, development teams must communicate and collaborate in a dynamic, 24/7/365 environment. There is no time to wait for long development cycles that produce software that is obsolete at launch. DevOps may be disruptive, but it is essential. The DevOps Summit at Cloud Expo – to be held June 3-5, 2015, at the Javits Center in New York City – will expand the DevOps community, enable a wide...
There is no question that the cloud is where businesses want to host data. Until recently hypervisor virtualization was the most widely used method in cloud computing. Recently virtual containers have been gaining in popularity, and for good reason. In the debate between virtual machines and containers, the latter have been seen as the new kid on the block – and like other emerging technology have had some initial shortcomings. However, the container space has evolved drastically since coming on...
Cloud Expo, Inc. has announced today that Andi Mann returns to DevOps Summit 2015 as Conference Chair. The 4th International DevOps Summit will take place on June 9-11, 2015, at the Javits Center in New York City. "DevOps is set to be one of the most profound disruptions to hit IT in decades," said Andi Mann. "It is a natural extension of cloud computing, and I have seen both firsthand and in independent research the fantastic results DevOps delivers. So I am excited to help the great team at ...
Explosive growth in connected devices. Enormous amounts of data for collection and analysis. Critical use of data for split-second decision making and actionable information. All three are factors in making the Internet of Things a reality. Yet, any one factor would have an IT organization pondering its infrastructure strategy. How should your organization enhance its IT framework to enable an Internet of Things implementation? In his session at Internet of @ThingsExpo, James Kirkland, Chief Ar...
The 17th International Cloud Expo has announced that its Call for Papers is open. 17th International Cloud Expo, to be held November 3-5, 2015, at the Santa Clara Convention Center in Santa Clara, CA, brings together Cloud Computing, APM, APIs, Microservices, Security, Big Data, Internet of Things, DevOps and WebRTC to one location. With cloud computing driving a higher percentage of enterprise IT budgets every year, it becomes increasingly important to plant your flag in this fast-expanding bu...
All major researchers estimate there will be tens of billions devices - computers, smartphones, tablets, and sensors - connected to the Internet by 2020. This number will continue to grow at a rapid pace for the next several decades. With major technology companies and startups seriously embracing IoT strategies, now is the perfect time to attend @ThingsExpo, June 9-11, 2015, at the Javits Center in New York City. Learn what is going on, contribute to the discussions, and ensure that your enter...
The security devil is always in the details of the attack: the ones you've endured, the ones you prepare yourself to fend off, and the ones that, you fear, will catch you completely unaware and defenseless. The Internet of Things (IoT) is nothing if not an endless proliferation of details. It's the vision of a world in which continuous Internet connectivity and addressability is embedded into a growing range of human artifacts, into the natural world, and even into our smartphones, appliances, a...