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Dell and Siemens Healthcare Enable Pomona Valley Hospital Medical Center to Meet Growing Demand for 3D Mammography

~ Pomona Valley Hospital Medical Center selects Dell and Siemens Healthcare to move growing image archive "from the basement to the cloud"

ROUND ROCK, Texas, Nov. 29, 2012 /PRNewswire/ -- Pomona Valley (Calif.) Hospital Medical Center (PVHMC) has selected Dell and Siemens Healthcare to provide diagnostic image archiving and sharing services to address long-term data storage needs. The move provides the hospital with a scalable and cost-effective storage and archival strategy for its new 3D breast imaging services. PVHMC will be using the archiving solution not just for 3D breast images but also for all other images, including cardiac, orthopedic and oncology clinical data.

Siemens Image Sharing & Archiving (ISA) solution, supported by Dell, provides a cloud-based, vendor-neutral image archive for storing and sharing radiology images and related clinical data. Siemens has incorporated Dell's clinical data management software into its ISA, and the Dell Cloud Clinical Archive provides redundant archiving support for Siemens Healthcare Computing Center.

PVHMC, a 453-bed, acute-care hospital serving eastern Los Angeles and western San Bernardino counties, determined last year to make 3D breast imaging with tomosynthesis available "to every woman, every time." Using 3D images, breast tomosynthesis allows radiologists a new way to see the size, shape and location of irregularities, which can potentially help them detect small tumors. However, with data storage needs up to 20 times higher than traditional full-field digital mammography, tomosynthesis is creating new challenges for mammography providers around data management and long-term storage.

The Dell-Siemens solution allows for rapid scalability without the overhead of maintaining and upgrading an ever-expanding storage infrastructure. It offers a reliable disaster recovery strategy with a pay-per-study pricing model, leading to significant cost-savings and risk mitigation long term.

The Dell Cloud Clinical Archive is now managing more than 78 million clinical studies, more than 5.4 billion imaging objects and supporting more than 800 clinical sites in one of the world's largest cloud-based, vendor-neutral medical image archives. For more information, visit www.dell.com/UnifiedClinicalArchive.

Siemens ISA replicates imaging data in three separate locations, including the Siemens Healthcare Computing Center (HCC) a leading cloud service that processes more than 238 million daily healthcare transactions and that hosts more than 4,300 servers. Image data can be accessed by DICOM query within the enterprise or by authorized external users via common industry integration profiles. More information about ISA is available at www.usa.siemens.com/ISA.

Quotes
"The Dell-Siemens solution is a much more efficient way to manage clinical data," said Kent Hoyos, PVHMC's CIO. "By moving our data center from the hospital's basement to the cloud, we will realize significant long-term cost savings while continuing to offer state-of-the-art diagnostic services for all of our patients' images."

"Breast tomosynthesis is going to revolutionize mammography screening and, more importantly, it's going to save lives," said Johnson Lightfoote, M.D., medical director of Radiology at PVHMC. "Partnering with Dell and Siemens will allow PVHMC's radiologists and support staff to focus solely on the woman and her 3D breast images and not concern ourselves with the storage of those images.  This partnership assures us that the images stored in the cloud will be readily available when needed."

"Healthcare providers shouldn't have to be experts in data storage and management," said James Coffin, Ph.D., vice president and general manager of Dell Healthcare and Life Sciences. "With Dell and Siemens, providers such as PVHMC can focus on what they do best while allowing trusted partners to manage their ongoing data center needs."

Learn more at www.DellWorld.com or follow #DellWorld on Twitter.

Dell is a trademark of Dell Inc. Dell disclaims any proprietary interest in the marks and names of others.

SOURCE Pomona Valley Hospital Medical Center

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