Welcome!

Cloud Expo Authors: Pat Romanski, Elizabeth White, Brad Anderson, Liz McMillan, Christopher Campbell

Related Topics: Cloud Expo, Java, SOA & WOA, Virtualization, AJAX & REA, PHP

Cloud Expo: Article

BitYota Start-Up Launches Data-Warehouse-as-a-Service

BitYota was one of eight start-ups hand-selected by Amazon to be showcased

Another one of Andreessen Horowitz's seemingly endless supply of gold-tinged start-ups whose future is supposed to be theirs to lose has come out of start-up hiding to proclaim the existence of its newfangled SaaS-style data-warehouse-as-a-service for Big Data analytics running initially on Amazon.

It's called BitYota - a name derived from the combination of the smallest element of computer storage and the yotta, the biggest number, or 1024 - and besides Andreessen Horowitz BitYota's $12 million in seed and Series A funding comes from Globespan Capital, the Social+Capital Partnership, Dawn Capital, Crosslink Capital, Morado Ventures and individual investors like Yahoo founder Jerry Yang; Yahoo board member and former eBay COO, angel investor Maynard Webb; investor and financial writer Graham Summers; and MapReduce BitYota-like start-up ClearStory Data founder and Marc Andreessen buddy Sharmila Mulligan, who's evidently spreading her bets on Big Data analytics.

BitYota was one of eight start-ups hand-selected by Amazon to be showcased at re:Invent, the Amazon Web Service (AWS) inaugural customer and partner event in Las Vegas this week, where AWS happened to announce Redshift, its own strategic data warehouse service in the cloud currently in closed beta.

It's unclear if that surprised BitYota, which has garnered six beta customers in the last few months including an ad tech, an edu tech and a mobile house. All it can really do is characterize Amazon's move as validation.

The start-up says its widgetry is designed to run on cloud infrastructure without compromising functionality or scalability. It plans to expand its service to other public clouds besides Amazon in the near future and with Redshift in the offing guess it'll have to.

BitYota dramatically claims its SaaS platform frees Big Data "from the shackles of Big Costs and Big Headaches" and makes its analytics solution accessible in the fastest, most affordable way to the most users, with no compromise on functionality or service levels.

Its attributes include one-click data integration, fast analytics at scale and accessibility using familiar tools.

It was built from the ground up around its own shared-nothing massively parallel relational database and is supposed to unite the feature-rich functionality of a full-scale data warehouse with the flexibility and cost-effectiveness of Amazon's cloud infrastructure so any company can unleash the value of their data to gain insights and make better business decisions.

BitYota figures it's got a fundamentally improved approach for those looking to harness the power of Big Data analytics. Key features include:

  • Affordable SaaS: Customers no longer have headaches about hardware provisioning or maintaining homogeneous configurations; software versions, upgrades and installations; database administrators manage and maintain the throughput of workloads; advance planning for growth and burst needs; and concurrent users.
  • Click Data Integration: Customers can load data from data sources such as S3, NoSQL stores and RDBMs and combine all their data including event logs, user profiles and transactions in a single place in the cloud. BitYota auto-detects varying data formats and schemas; understands the rate of arrival/change of new data and seamlessly loads it on a pre-determined schedule.
  • Fast Analytics at Scale using Familiar Tools: BitYota's patent-pending massive parallel analytics engine enables analysis over fresh, fully detailed data. It works in the existing ecosystem of programming languages and BI tools; supports SQL92 natively and integrates via an industry-standard ODBC API with popular business intelligence tools and dashboards to visualize results. Access is via industry-standard languages like JavaScript, Perl, and Python and tools that analyze data without any new or intermediary language skills.

"Companies across every spectrum have an undeniable need to use data to unlock new sources of economic value but relatively few companies have invested sufficient time, money or people to do this right," BitYota CEO Dev Patel, who worked on Hadoop at Yahoo, said. "We believe that data and analytics should be broadly accessible to everyone inside the company and it shouldn't take a fortune to analyze data. I'm proud to say that today BitYota launched a data warehouse-as-a-service that allows just that. We are a cost-effective, self-managing and intuitive service that empowers users to work with their own data in familiar ways, with little retooling or disruption."

The starter widgetry costs $1,500 a month for five users starting with 10 EC2 compute unit and 500GB. It's capable of five concurrent queries. There's a week's free trial on a smaller configuration at www.bityota.com/pricing/.

The market for Big Data technology and services is supposed to grow from $3.2 billion in 2010 to $16.9 billion in 2015, at a 40% CAGR. The forecast is split between 34.2% software, 27.3% servers and 61.4% storage.

BitYota's addressable target market is supposed to be a portion of the $5.8 billion operating on public clouds or roughly $3 billion.

It has visions of being to data warehousing what Salesforce has been to customer relationship management.

However, its immediate market would be companies with relatively small data warehouses, or folks already generating their data on Amazon cloud, if Amazon doesn't gobble them all up.

The company, which so far has 15 people, was founded in 2011 by executives and senior engineers with Big Data experience from Yahoo, Oracle, Veritas/Symantec, Informix, BMC, Kabira/Tibco and Twitter.

One of its founders, chief of cloud services Soren Riise, was an honest-to-God rocket scientist at the European Space Agency. Another co-founder, CTO Harmeek Bedi, used to be a lead database architect at Oracle and Informix after IBM bought it.

More Stories By Maureen O'Gara

Maureen O'Gara the most read technology reporter for the past 20 years, is the Cloud Computing and Virtualization News Desk editor of SYS-CON Media. She is the publisher of famous "Billygrams" and the editor-in-chief of "Client/Server News" for more than a decade. One of the most respected technology reporters in the business, Maureen can be reached by email at maureen(at)sys-con.com or paperboy(at)g2news.com, and by phone at 516 759-7025. Twitter: @MaureenOGara

Comments (0)

Share your thoughts on this story.

Add your comment
You must be signed in to add a comment. Sign-in | Register

In accordance with our Comment Policy, we encourage comments that are on topic, relevant and to-the-point. We will remove comments that include profanity, personal attacks, racial slurs, threats of violence, or other inappropriate material that violates our Terms and Conditions, and will block users who make repeated violations. We ask all readers to expect diversity of opinion and to treat one another with dignity and respect.


Cloud Expo Breaking News
Simply defined the SDDC promises that you’ll be able to treat “all” of your IT infrastructure as if it’s completely malleable. That there are no restrictions to how you can use and assign everything from border controls to VM size as long as you stay within the technical capabilities of the devices. The promise is great, but the reality is still a dream for the majority of enterprises. In his session at 14th Cloud Expo, Mark Thiele, EVP, Data Center Tech, at SUPERNAP, will cover where and how a business might benefit from SDDC and also why they should or shouldn’t attempt to adopt today.
MapDB is an Apache-licensed open source database specifically designed for Java developers. The library uses the standard Java Collections API, making it totally natural for Java developers to use and adopt, while scaling database size from GBs to TBs. MapDB is very fast and supports an agile approach to data, allowing developers to construct flexible schemas to exactly match application needs and tune performance, durability and caching for specific requirements.
APIs came about to help companies create and manage their digital ecosystem, enabling them not only to reach more customers through more devices, but also create a large supporting ecosystem of developers and partners. While Facebook, Twitter and Netflix were the early adopters of APIs, large enterprises have been quick to embrace the concept of APIs and have been leveraging APIs as a connective tissue that powers all interactions between their customers, partners and employees. As enterprises embrace APIs, some very specific Enterprise API Adoption patterns and best practices have started emerging. In his session at 14th Cloud Expo, Sachin Agarwal, VP of Product Marketing and Strategy at SOA Software, will talk about the most common enterprise API patterns and will discuss how enterprises can successfully launch an API program.
The social media expansion has shown just how people are eager to share their experiences with the rest of the world. Cloud technology is the perfect platform to satisfy this need given its great flexibility and readiness. At Cynny, we aim to revolutionize how people share and organize their digital life through a brand new cloud service, starting from infrastructure to the users’ interface. A revolution that began from inventing and designing our very own infrastructure: we have created the first server network powered solely by ARM CPU. The microservers have “organism-like” features, differentiating them from any of the current technologies. Benefits include low consumption of energy, making Cynny the ecologically friendly alternative for storage as well as cheaper infrastructure, lower running costs, etc.
Next-Gen Cloud. Whatever you call it, there’s a higher calling for cloud computing that requires providers to change their spots and move from a commodity mindset to a premium one. Businesses can no longer maintain the status quo that today’s service providers offer. Yes, the continuity, speed, mobility, data access and connectivity are staples of the cloud and always will be. But cloud providers that plan to not only exist tomorrow – but to lead – know that security must be the top priority for the cloud and are delivering it now. In his session at 14th Cloud Expo, Kurt Hagerman, Chief Information Security Officer at FireHost, will detail why and how you can have both infrastructure performance and enterprise-grade security – and what tomorrow's cloud provider will look like.
Today, developers and business units are leading the charge to cloud computing. The primary driver: faster access to computing resources by using the cloud's automated infrastructure provisioning. However, fast access to infrastructure exposes the next friction point: creating, delivering, and operating applications much faster. In his session at 14th Cloud Expo, Bernard Golden, VP of Strategy at ActiveState, will discuss why solving the next friction point is critical for true cloud computing success and how developers and business units can leverage service catalogs, frameworks, and DevOps to achieve the true goal of IT: delivering increased business value through applications.
Web conferencing in a public cloud has the same risks as any other cloud service. If you have ever had concerns over the types of data being shared in your employees’ web conferences, such as IP, financials or customer data, then it’s time to look at web conferencing in a private cloud. In her session at 14th Cloud Expo, Courtney Behrens, Senior Marketing Manager at Brother International, will discuss how issues that had previously been out of your control, like performance, advanced administration and compliance, can now be put back behind your firewall.
More and more enterprises today are doing business by opening up their data and applications through APIs. Though forward-thinking and strategic, exposing APIs also increases the surface area for potential attack by hackers. To benefit from APIs while staying secure, enterprises and security architects need to continue to develop a deep understanding about API security and how it differs from traditional web application security or mobile application security. In his session at 14th Cloud Expo, Sachin Agarwal, VP of Product Marketing and Strategy at SOA Software, will walk you through the various aspects of how an API could be potentially exploited. He will discuss the necessary best practices to secure your data and enterprise applications while continue continuing to support your business’s digital initiatives.
The revolution that happened in the server universe over the past 15 years has resulted in an eco-system that is more open, more democratically innovative and produced better results in technically challenging dimensions like scale. The underpinnings of the revolution were common hardware, standards based APIs (ex. POSIX) and a strict adherence to layering and isolation between applications, daemons and kernel drivers/modules which allowed multiple types of development happen in parallel without hindering others. Put simply, today's server model is built on a consistent x86 platform with few surprises in its core components. A kernel abstracts away the platform, so that applications and daemons are decoupled from the hardware. In contrast, networking equipment is still stuck in the mainframe era. Today, networking equipment is a single appliance, including hardware, OS, applications and user interface come as a monolithic entity from a single vendor. Switching between different vendor'...
Cloud backup and recovery services are critical to safeguarding an organization’s data and ensuring business continuity when technical failures and outages occur. With so many choices, how do you find the right provider for your specific needs? In his session at 14th Cloud Expo, Daniel Jacobson, Technology Manager at BUMI, will outline the key factors including backup configurations, proactive monitoring, data restoration, disaster recovery drills, security, compliance and data center resources. Aside from the technical considerations, the secret sauce in identifying the best vendor is the level of focus, expertise and specialization of their engineering team and support group, and how they monitor your day-to-day backups, provide recommendations, and guide you through restores when necessary.
Cloud scalability and performance should be at the heart of every successful Internet venture. The infrastructure needs to be resilient, flexible, and fast – it’s best not to get caught thinking about architecture until the middle of an emergency, when it's too late. In his interactive, no-holds-barred session at 14th Cloud Expo, Phil Jackson, Development Community Advocate for SoftLayer, will dive into how to design and build-out the right cloud infrastructure.
You use an agile process; your goal is to make your organization more agile. What about your data infrastructure? The truth is, today’s databases are anything but agile – they are effectively static repositories that are cumbersome to work with, difficult to change, and cannot keep pace with application demands. Performance suffers as a result, and it takes far longer than it should to deliver on new features and capabilities needed to make your organization competitive. As your application and business needs change, data repositories and structures get outmoded rapidly, resulting in increased work for application developers and slow performance for end users. Further, as data sizes grow into the Big Data realm, this problem is exacerbated and becomes even more difficult to address. A seemingly simple schema change can take hours (or more) to perform, and as requirements evolve the disconnect between existing data structures and actual needs diverge.
SYS-CON Events announced today that SherWeb, a long-time leading provider of cloud services and Microsoft's 2013 World Hosting Partner of the Year, will exhibit at SYS-CON's 14th International Cloud Expo®, which will take place on June 10–12, 2014, at the Javits Center in New York City, New York. A worldwide hosted services leader ranking in the prestigious North American Deloitte Technology Fast 500TM, and Microsoft's 2013 World Hosting Partner of the Year, SherWeb provides competitive cloud solutions to businesses and partners around the world. Founded in 1998, SherWeb is a privately owned company headquartered in Quebec, Canada. Its service portfolio includes Microsoft Exchange, SharePoint, Lync, Dynamics CRM and more.
The world of cloud and application development is not just for the hardened developer these days. In their session at 14th Cloud Expo, Phil Jackson, Development Community Advocate for SoftLayer, and Harold Hannon, Sr. Software Architect at SoftLayer, will pull back the curtain of the architecture of a fun demo application purpose-built for the cloud. They will focus on demonstrating how they leveraged compute, storage, messaging, and other cloud elements hosted at SoftLayer to lower the effort and difficulty of putting together a useful application. This will be an active demonstration and review of simple command-line tools and resources, so don’t be afraid if you are not a seasoned developer.
SYS-CON Events announced today that BUMI, a premium managed service provider specializing in data backup and recovery, will exhibit at SYS-CON's 14th International Cloud Expo®, which will take place on June 10–12, 2014, at the Javits Center in New York City, New York. Manhattan-based BUMI (Backup My Info!) is a premium managed service provider specializing in data backup and recovery. Founded in 2002, the company’s Here, There and Everywhere data backup and recovery solutions are utilized by more than 500 businesses. BUMI clients include professional service organizations such as banking, financial, insurance, accounting, hedge funds and law firms. The company is known for its relentless passion for customer service and support, and has won numerous awards, including Customer Service Provider of the Year and 10 Best Companies to Work For.