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Gladinet Cloud and It’s Enterprise Focus

In 2012, Gladinet Cloud continues to differentiate from other online storage solutions.

While most of the online storage solutions provide a folder sync solution, Gladinet provides a drive mapping solution. Drive mapping provides random on-demand access without the wait for full sync to finish, which is a very good fit for VDI environment.

While most of the online storage solutions provide a client device solution, Gladinet provides a file server solution in addition to the client applications. With Gladinet, you can sync a file server share to the cloud and use the share folder over the Internet.

While most of the online storage solution resells Amazon S3, Gladinet provides a plugin-your-own-cloud-storage option in addition to the default Amazon S3 storage. If you have Windows Azure, Google Cloud Storage, HP Cloud storage, Nirvanix, OpenStack Swift and EMC Atmos, you can use Gladinet Cloud.

Enterprise Focus

The above features are very enterprise friendly, such as the use of drive to solve big data problem; the support for file server to synchronize folders and the ability to plug in private cloud options such as OpenStack Swift, Nirvanix and EMC Atmos.

Now with the release of “Gladinet Cloud Enterprise”, Gladinet Cloud focuses even more on the enterprise with the self-installable, self-host and self-brandable enterprise and service provider editions. When it is self-installed and self-hosted, it opens doors for file server storage, NAS Storage, SAN storage and different kind of storage as the backend storage. It also allows native Active Directory integration. Unlike in the public Gladinet Cloud situation, supporting Active Directory has to be done by an on-site agent. When it is self-installed, Active Directory can be connected directly.

Product Suite

There are four related products: "Gladinet Cloud", "Gladinet Cloud Enterprise (Business)", "Gladinet Cloud Enterprise (Service Provider)" and "Gladinet Cloud Cluster for Service Providers".

"Gladinet Cloud" runs on our public Gladinet site, providing access, backup, sync , and team collaboration features for business. It provides three important components: cloud storage, clients to access the cloud storage (mobile devices, desktops, file servers, web browsers) and the access infrastructure which brokers communication between the clients and the cloud storage with added benefits like distributed file locking, instant file server migration, active directory integration and more.

"Gladinet Cloud Enterprise" packages all of the "Gladinet Cloud" access infrastructure into a package that an Enterprise can install on-premise, or inside a DMZ to have full control and security protection, with optional native Active Directory integration. You can set any storage (or your own file servers) as the default cloud storage and provide it to your customers. This product is a good fit for a single enterprise.

"Gladinet Cloud Enterprise for Service Providers" is the same as "Gladinet Cloud Enterprise" with support for multiple tenants and integration with multiple AD domains.  This is a good fit for a service provider who wants to support multiple businesses through a single instance. It includes some limited branding options. 


"Gladinet Cloud Cluster" is a "big brother" of "Gladinet Cloud Enterprise" since it has multi-tenant support,  offers full branding, and everything else you need as a service provider to run "Gladinet Cloud" in your own data center, under your own control. It can also scale easily to provide a multi-server farm that can support hundreds of thousands of users or more. The full branding includes web site, native clients, mobile clients, and all "skin" changes. If you consider "Gladinet Cloud Enterprise" the self-service option for service providers. This is the full-service version. Branding includes development cost to embed logos and bitmaps into various access clients.

visit http://www.gladinet.com/ for more information.

Read the original blog entry...

More Stories By Jerry Huang

Jerry Huang, an engineer and entrepreneur, founded Gladinet with his close friends and is pursuing interests in the cloud computing. He has published articles on the company blog as well as following up on the company twitter activities. He graduated from the University of Michigan in 1998 and has lived in West Palm Beach, Florida since.

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