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FICO Relocates Headquarters to Silicon Valley

New headquarters provide global analytics software leader with a hub for innovation and development in San Jose, Calif.

SAN JOSE, Calif., Jan. 4, 2013 /PRNewswire/ -- FICO (NYSE: FICO), the leading provider of predictive analytics and decision management technology, today announced that it has relocated its corporate headquarters to San Jose, Calif. from Minneapolis. The new headquarters will serve as an innovation and development hub in the heart of Silicon Valley, enabling the company to continue to take advantage of technology innovations in Big Data and cloud computing, and draw from the region's deep technology talent pool.

(Logo: http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20111010/CG83314LOGO)

The move brings FICO back to its origins — the company was founded as Fair, Isaac in 1956 by engineer Bill Fair and mathematician Earl Isaac, who met when working on operations research projects at the Stanford Research Institute in Menlo Park, Calif. In its early days, the company revolutionized consumer lending through credit scoring, with analytic products such as the FICO® Score, the standard measure of U.S. consumer credit health. Today banks, retailers, insurance companies, government agencies, pharmaceuticals companies, telecommunications firms and many other organizations use FICO analytic software to make better decisions.

"FICO began in Silicon Valley, and we view this move as a homecoming," said Will Lansing, president and CEO of FICO. "Operating from our base in Silicon Valley, we can more readily build upon our company's deep talent pool, collaborate with other big thinkers in the world's premier technology hub, and provide our customers worldwide with powerful innovations that will help them compete more effectively in the era of Big Data."

"I want to thank FICO for choosing to locate its headquarters in San Jose and expanding its presence in Silicon Valley," said San Jose Mayor Chuck Reed. "A leader in the growing field of analytics, FICO exemplifies the type of innovation that makes San Jose the Capital of Silicon Valley. By returning to its roots in Silicon Valley, FICO will have greater access to talent as well as global business and technology partners."

FICO currently employs 90 people in San Jose, and plans to hire additional engineers and analytic scientists throughout the year. The company will continue to maintain regional hubs in San Diego and San Rafael, Calif., London and Birmingham, England, Singapore, Beijing, Sao Paolo, Brazil and at its new offices in Roseville, Minn., which opened last month.

About FICO
FICO (NYSE:FICO) delivers superior predictive analytics solutions that drive smarter decisions. The company's groundbreaking use of mathematics to predict consumer behavior has transformed entire industries and revolutionized the way risk is managed and products are marketed. FICO's innovative solutions include the FICO® Score — the standard measure of consumer credit risk in the United States — along with industry-leading solutions for managing credit accounts, identifying and minimizing the impact of fraud, and customizing consumer offers with pinpoint accuracy. Most of the world's top banks, as well as leading insurers, retailers, pharmaceutical companies and government agencies, rely on FICO solutions to accelerate growth, control risk, boost profits and meet regulatory and competitive demands. FICO also helps millions of individuals manage their personal credit health through www.myFICO.com. Learn more at www.fico.com. FICO: Make every decision count.

For FICO news and media resources, visit www.fico.com/news.

Statement Concerning Forward-Looking Information
Except for historical information contained herein, the statements contained in this news release that relate to FICO or its business are forward-looking statements within the meaning of the "safe harbor" provisions of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. These forward-looking statements are subject to risks and uncertainties that may cause actual results to differ materially, including the success of the Company's Decision Management strategy and reengineering plan, the maintenance of its existing relationships and ability to create new relationships with customers and key alliance partners, its ability to continue to develop new and enhanced products and services, its ability to recruit and retain key technical and managerial personnel, competition, regulatory changes applicable to the use of consumer credit and other data, the failure to realize the anticipated benefits of any acquisitions, continuing material adverse developments in global economic conditions, and other risks described from time to time in FICO's SEC reports, including its Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended September 30, 2012. If any of these risks or uncertainties materializes, FICO's results could differ materially from its expectations. FICO disclaims any intent or obligation to update these forward-looking statements.

FICO and "Make every decision count" are trademarks or registered trademarks of Fair Isaac Corporation in the United States and in other countries.

SOURCE FICO

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