Welcome!

@CloudExpo Authors: Liz McMillan, Zakia Bouachraoui, Yeshim Deniz, Pat Romanski, Elizabeth White

News Feed Item

Rackspace Announces Open Source Datacenter Strategy

Rackspace® Hosting (NYSE: RAX) COO Mark Roenigk today unveiled plans by the San Antonio-based open cloud company to support and partner with Open Compute suppliers that provide open source datacenter solutions.

Rackspace launched the industry’s first OpenStack powered cloud platform of compute, storage and networking in 2012.

“Rackspace will support those companies and organizations that share our vision for an open cloud,” said Roenigk. “Rackspace is committed to supporting like-minded companies who are dedicated to open standards and breaking down the engineering barriers that lock users into proprietary technologies.”

Rackspace COO and Open Compute Foundation board member Roenigk delivered his remarks today during his keynote address at the Open Compute Summit in Santa Clara, CA.

Rackspace has contributed a server design to the Open Compute Project community and expects to announce plans later this year to purchase servers from Open Compute Project suppliers for one of the company’s new data centers.

“Open Compute Project members like Rackspace are breaking down the barriers for open cloud adoption,” said Frank Frankovsky, Chairman of the Open Compute Foundation Chairman and Vice President of Hardware Design & Supply Chain at Facebook. “Today’s announcement by Rackspace shows the progress that the Open Compute Project is making in advancing open source infrastructure technologies.”

Rackspace is a founding member of the Open Compute Project and has worked closely with technology leaders who share a common vision for the future around open standards. As a founder of OpenStack, Rackspace’s work with the Open Compute Project aligns with this vision.

The Open Compute Project is a rapidly growing community of engineers around the world whose mission is to design and enable the use of the most efficient server, storage and data center hardware designs for scalable computing. Open Compute members believe that openly sharing ideas, specifications and other intellectual property is the key to maximizing innovation and reducing operational complexity in the scalable computing space.

Rackspace® Hosting (NYSE: RAX) is the open cloud company, delivering open technologies and powering more than 197,000 customers worldwide. Rackspace provides its renowned Fanatical Support® across a broad portfolio of IT products, including Public Cloud, Private Cloud, Hybrid Hosting and Dedicated Hosting. Rackspace has been recognized by Bloomberg BusinessWeek as a Top 100 Performing Technology Company, is featured on Fortune’s list of 100 Best Companies to Work For and is included on the Dow Jones Sustainability Index. Rackspace was positioned in the Leaders Quadrant by Gartner Inc. in the “2011 Magic Quadrant for Managed Hosting.” Rackspace is headquartered in San Antonio with offices and data centers around the world. For more information, visit www.rackspace.com.

Rackspace® is a registered trademark of Rackspace Hosting Inc. OpenStack® is a registered trademark of the OpenStack Foundation. Other names may be trademarks of their respective owners.

Forward-Looking Statements

This press release contains forward-looking statements that involve risks, uncertainties and assumptions. If such risks or uncertainties materialize or such assumptions prove incorrect, the results of Rackspace Hosting could differ materially from those expressed or implied by such forward-looking statements and assumptions. All statements other than statements of historical fact are statements that could be deemed forward-looking statements, including any statements concerning expected development, performance or market acceptance associated with the Open Compute project; anticipated operational and financial benefits from the Open Compute project; any statements of expectation or belief; and any statements of assumptions underlying any of the foregoing. Risks, uncertainties and assumptions include including the possibility that expected benefits from the Open Compute project, support services and training may not materialize because Open Compute products and services are not generally accepted in the marketplace, which could occur due to certain factors including (i) a failure to market the products and services cost effectively, differentiate the products and services from competitive products or communicate differentiations effectively, (ii) the reliability, quality or compatibility associated with the products and services, (iii) changes in technology which adversely affect the benefits of the products and services, (iv) slowdowns in the general economy or technology industry that impact consumer spending habits, (v) internal strategy decisions that impact the products and services, and (vi) other risks that are described in Rackspace Hosting’s Form 10-Q for the quarter ended September 30, 2012, filed with the SEC on November 7, 2012. Except as required by law, Rackspace Hosting assumes no obligation to update these forward-looking statements publicly, or to update the reasons actual results could differ materially from those anticipated in these forward-looking statements, even if new information becomes available in the future.

More Stories By Business Wire

Copyright © 2009 Business Wire. All rights reserved. Republication or redistribution of Business Wire content is expressly prohibited without the prior written consent of Business Wire. Business Wire shall not be liable for any errors or delays in the content, or for any actions taken in reliance thereon.

CloudEXPO Stories
With more than 30 Kubernetes solutions in the marketplace, it's tempting to think Kubernetes and the vendor ecosystem has solved the problem of operationalizing containers at scale or of automatically managing the elasticity of the underlying infrastructure that these solutions need to be truly scalable. Far from it. There are at least six major pain points that companies experience when they try to deploy and run Kubernetes in their complex environments. In this presentation, the speaker will detail these pain points and explain how cloud can address them.
The deluge of IoT sensor data collected from connected devices and the powerful AI required to make that data actionable are giving rise to a hybrid ecosystem in which cloud, on-prem and edge processes become interweaved. Attendees will learn how emerging composable infrastructure solutions deliver the adaptive architecture needed to manage this new data reality. Machine learning algorithms can better anticipate data storms and automate resources to support surges, including fully scalable GPU-centric compute for the most data-intensive applications. Hyperconverged systems already in place can be revitalized with vendor-agnostic, PCIe-deployed, disaggregated approach to composable, maximizing the value of previous investments.
When building large, cloud-based applications that operate at a high scale, it's important to maintain a high availability and resilience to failures. In order to do that, you must be tolerant of failures, even in light of failures in other areas of your application. "Fly two mistakes high" is an old adage in the radio control airplane hobby. It means, fly high enough so that if you make a mistake, you can continue flying with room to still make mistakes. In his session at 18th Cloud Expo, Lee Atchison, Principal Cloud Architect and Advocate at New Relic, discussed how this same philosophy can be applied to highly scaled applications, and can dramatically increase your resilience to failure.
Machine learning has taken residence at our cities' cores and now we can finally have "smart cities." Cities are a collection of buildings made to provide the structure and safety necessary for people to function, create and survive. Buildings are a pool of ever-changing performance data from large automated systems such as heating and cooling to the people that live and work within them. Through machine learning, buildings can optimize performance, reduce costs, and improve occupant comfort by sharing information within the building and with outside city infrastructure via real time shared cloud capabilities.
As Cybric's Chief Technology Officer, Mike D. Kail is responsible for the strategic vision and technical direction of the platform. Prior to founding Cybric, Mike was Yahoo's CIO and SVP of Infrastructure, where he led the IT and Data Center functions for the company. He has more than 24 years of IT Operations experience with a focus on highly-scalable architectures.