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Poor Video Quality Prevents Social Networkers from Sharing Video

90% Won't Share the Video They Capture, Resulted in 8 Billion Unshared Mobile Videos in 2012

CAMBRIDGE, Mass., Jan. 23, 2013 /PRNewswire/ -- Vivoom, the simple but powerful cloud video enhancer, today released data showing that poor image quality is a top de-motivator for consumers who otherwise would share the video they take. Despite advances in technology, social video hasn't taken off; eight billion videos were captured on mobile devices in 2012 but never shared because they have no easy way to make them look better. If a video application existed that empowered everyone to make the video they capture higher quality and more engaging, it could exponentially increase the number of videos shared every year.

Social networkers share visual content every day as part of maintaining their online image, but are not currently sharing video to its full potential. The lack of sharing is not due to a lack of ability to capture—every smartphone today includes a video camera and options to share video. In fact, video capture is actually quite common: IDC research suggests that mobile phone users captured more than nine billion in the US last year alone. The ease of video sharing isn't a factor, either—new mobile video applications have solved the technical hurdles and made it exceptionally easy to share video from a mobile device. However, they've failed to help users make their video worth sharing in the first place and consequently have seen steep declines in their active user base.

These users aren't sharing video because they have no way to improve the quality. Sharing unattractive content is unsatisfying since it is considerably less likely that their friends and family will notice and appreciate it. Today, it is too difficult, too time-consuming, and requires advanced creative skills for users to make their video look its best.  However, if they had a way to easily improve quality, an overwhelming majority of people capturing mobile video would share the video they capture.

"Quality is a significantly more complex challenge for video than it is for photos," says Katherine Hays, CEO of Vivoom. "We believe—and this research shows—that if consumers are given a fun but effective way to improve video quality themselves, they are significantly more likely to share their videos with friends and family. We estimate removing the quality barrier could increase total social video sharing from 1 billion to 30 billion per year."

Research Highlights:

  • Social networkers use the content they share to positively influence others' impressions and use feedback to gauge their success in doing so. Over 80% share content online in order to get validation and positive feedback from others.
  • More than 80% of social networkers feel it is important for their content to look good before they feel comfortable sharing it online.
  • The top three things that social networkers look for when considering whether to share a video are quality, relevance, and ability to get a reaction from their friends.
  • Social networkers are able to detect a high-quality video when they see one—even when the image resolution is the same. In fact, 94% of consumers prefer a video enhanced with a Vivoom look over an unenhanced one and identified it as "looking better."
  • Despite most social networkers' hesitancy to share video today, 75% agree that they would share a video they had taken if they could improve the quality and make it look more visually appealing easily; 81% would share if they could customize their video quickly.

To download the full white paper and research brief, visit www.vivoom.co/press.

About Vivoom™

Vivoom is the only cloud-based video enhancer that lets you make each video you've captured one you're happy to share. Vivoom helps you create stunning video that your friends will notice and appreciate. Your video not only looks dramatically better every time but also reflects your style because Vivoom suggests a set of Looks specific to you and your video context from a portfolio of thousands of the world's best-performing Looks. Founded in 2012, Vivoom seamlessly integrates into digital media sites so their users can create more engaging video their friends will love to watch.

www.vivoom.co

SOURCE Vivoom

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