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Ubiquisys and Quortus to Demonstrate Small-Cell-Based Mobile PBX at Mobile World Congress

Ubiquisys, the developer of intelligent multi-mode small cells, and Quortus, the company transforming core network functionality into edge-based applications, today announced that they will demonstrate a small-cell-based mobile PBX at Mobile World Congress. The companies will show a Ubiquisys enterprise smart cell loaded with Quortus’ EdgeCentrix software to create an all-mobile PBX for businesses, eliminating the need for desk phones as well as giving operators a compelling offering for the underserved small and medium business (SMB) segment.

The solution comprises a Ubiquisys enterprise smart cell – complete with an integrated computing platform based on Intel® architecture – with Quortus’ EdgeCentrix application which allows core network functionality to be handled locally. When combined, they create a simple yet powerful all-mobile PBX capable of handling all local voice and data requests. Furthermore, any mobile phone will be able to access the same features as an IP desk phone such as conference calling, call transfer, dual ringing, find-me services and hunt-groups without installing a downloaded client to the handset. The application is distributed and remotely provisioned on smart cells through the Intel AppUp® SMB Service, which is built on the Intel Hybrid Cloud software platform, that enables service providers to deliver the benefits of cloud computing on distributed networked devices.

For businesses, this means they can now replace their existing fixed-line PBX and have a truly mobile workforce. With dependable 5-bar in-building signal matching fixed lines for call quality, employees are able to use their own mobile phone instead of their desk phone, improving workforce productivity and user satisfaction. When making calls, a user always dials the same number from their contact list, and if the target user is also within the coverage area of the office smart cell, the call is routed locally on the cell without touching the macro network. If the target user is outside the smart cell’s range then the call goes to the macro network as usual. This creates a seamless experience for the end-user with the added benefit of optimal-cost routing of calls for enterprises.

For operators and MVNOs, this represents a chance to tap in to the enterprise market, especially the SMB segment. This flexible solution makes the most of existing technologies, is easy to install and requires no complex core billing system changes.

“The mobile phone has become the preferred connection for the majority of communication. However, poor in-building mobile coverage and the lack of the functions offered by the traditional PBX have prevented mobile being their preferred method for the enterprise,” said Pete Keevill, Vice President of Engineering and co-founder of Ubiquisys. “Our Smart Cell not only ensures reliable coverage but provides the computing power to deliver advanced functions and applications. As enterprise small cell deployments continue to accelerate, I believe we will see mobile form the basis of many forward-thinking companies’ communications in the not so distant-future.”

“Operators have always faced challenges in targeting the enterprise market and have, to date, failed to break the fixed-line monopoly,” said Andy Odgers, CEO Quortus. “By taking network intelligence and placing it on enterprise small cells we can now give every office its own self-contained mobile network that provides a seamless experience for end-users. I expect this technology will be the key to creating a truly mobile workforce.”

Ubiquisys and Quortus will be demonstrating their joint solution at Mobile World Congress in Barcelona on February 25–28, 2013. The Ubiquisys meeting and demo suite is located in Hall 1 - contact [email protected] to request a meeting.

About Ubiquisys

Ubiquisys is a leader in intelligent multi-mode LTE-HSPA-WiFi small cells, with products deployed by operators around the world.

The Ubiquisys difference is intelligence: high-availability small cells that continuously adapt to their surroundings and dynamically interact with their neighbours. Operators benefit from macro-level KPIs, low operating costs and efficient use of spectrum assets, whilst mobile users experience dependable voice and high speed data services. The Ubiquisys small cell range includes public-access hotspots, self-organising networks for enterprise, and modular residential small cells designed for home device integration.

Ubiquisys has pioneered the smart cell: part small cell hotspot, part powerful computing platform. This new class of small cell adds cloud and core networking capabilities at the edge of the network, bringing new services closer to mobile users. www.ubiquisys.com

About Quortus

Quortus is changing the nature of mobile networks by allowing operators to embed full core network functionality into cost-effective software applications deployable on small cells. These ultra-smart small cells can be deployed in enterprises, metro hotspots and rural areas where they act as complete mobile networks thereby drastically easing the load on the traditional network and transforming the user experience. For the first time advanced network features can be handled at the edge including smart voice and data offload; session creation, switching & handoff; traffic compression & aggregation; and edge caching & presence information for mobile apps. The company is headquartered in the UK.

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