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Momentum Grows for Federal Identity, Credential, and Access Management (FICAM) Architecture

Alongside Experts on the New FICAM Roadmap, Radiant Logic Advocates the Standard to IT Professionals and Showcases Reference Implementation as a Blueprint for Large-Scale IAM Deployments

WASHINGTON, DC -- (Marketwire) -- 02/15/13 -- Two drafters of the Federal Identity, Credential, and Access Management (FICAM) roadmap addressed IT professionals from federal and state governments, as well as the private sector, during a recent forum at the International Spy Museum. Released in December 2011, the FICAM 2.0 roadmap is a project of the Federal Chief Information Officers Council to establish a common framework for identity services, aimed at providing better service while improving the nation's cybersecurity. The forum's packed attendance is indicative of the growing attention these technologies are receiving.

Anil John and Rajeev Pillai of the General Services Administration, experts on the FICAM standards, laid out the core components of the federally mandated roadmap to an audience of more than 40 IT managers and professionals. The experts cited increasing risk to cybersecurity posed by weak identity and access management systems and the growing demand for a higher quality of service from government agencies as chief motivators in developing the roadmap.

At the Feb. 7, 2013, forum, representatives of leading identity and context virtualization vendor Radiant Logic also detailed how their federated identity service was tailored to meet precisely the requirements of a core component of the FICAM infrastructure, the "Authoritative Attribute Exchange Service."

"The standards adopted in the FICAM framework are actually quite innovative," explained Radiant Logic CEO, Michel Prompt. "Building a coherent view of all of an organization's users and providing a single point of access for applications to read identity information about users is at the heart of FICAM, and is completely consistent with what some of the most advanced companies in the private sector are doing. That's why we're starting to see interest in FICAM from major Fortune 500 companies -- they see the promise of this initiative as a framework for the future, inside and outside of government. We're proud to support FICAM and to play a role in these developments."

Radiant Logic's flagship product, the RadiantOne Federated Identity Service, recently reached its 6.1 release. This update expands its capabilities in the central role of Authoritative Attribute Exchange Service in FICAM deployments, and brings support for RSA's Distributed Credential Protection technology.

About Radiant Logic

As the market leader for identity virtualization, Radiant Logic delivers simple, logical, and standards-based access to all identity within an organization. The RadiantOne federated identity service enables customizable identity views built from disparate data silos, driving critical authentication and authorization decisions for WAM, federation, and cloud deployments. Fortune 1000 companies rely on RadiantOne to deliver quick ROI by reducing administrative effort, simplifying integration tasks, and building a flexible infrastructure to meet changing business demands.

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