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Space Monkey May Be Nearing Public Beta

It aims to put a cloud in every house and says it’s “building a storage network the likes of which have never been seen"

Space Monkey, the Google-backed P2P start-up that intends to compete against Box and Dropbox not to mention the likes of Google Drive and SkyDrive, seems to be slowly pumping up publicity for its widget so maybe it's getting close to its promised public beta if it can get the Kickstarter money to bring the thing to market.

Space Monkey aims to put a cloud in every house and says it's "building a storage network the likes of which have never been seen."

It involves a local storage device and a $10-a-month subscription for a terabyte of online storage, which is 10 times the storage you'd get from Dropbox for the same money.

It's looking to satisfy people with a lot of data as well as people who'd have a lot of data if they could afford it. (Think about those huge video files.)

It says anything stored on Space Money is immediately encrypted then broken into a thousand pieces and distributed in bits here and there around its user network and backed up on other devices. The start-up claims the data is "virtually indestructible."

The user gets the backup, sharing and anywhere accessibility of the cloud reportedly at 60 times faster speeds and a cheaper price for a lot more storage than the traditional cloud service - which is why its founders figure they're going to disrupt the cloud.

They also claim tight security and say unlike traditional cloud storage providers, their data protection is "verifiable and auditable by anyone with the inclination to do so, providing provable protection of your privacy and security."

Files are accessible from any device including iOS and Android mobile devices, Windows, Mac and Linux clients, as well as any other web browser-enabled technology. It also obviously offers offline access.

Since they've designed a network that will scale to millions of Space Monkey devices residing in millions of different locations, they also say that they've built a remote management platform as a core part of the foundation of the Space Monkey software stack.

"Remotely managing devices that are spread across the globe is a unique problem not solved by any existing software written by traditional cloud storage companies. So, we've spent an enormous amount of energy and resources to make sure we can effectively roll out updates to devices remotely and automatically, without you ever having to lift a finger."

More Stories By Maureen O'Gara

Maureen O'Gara the most read technology reporter for the past 20 years, is the Cloud Computing and Virtualization News Desk editor of SYS-CON Media. She is the publisher of famous "Billygrams" and the editor-in-chief of "Client/Server News" for more than a decade. One of the most respected technology reporters in the business, Maureen can be reached by email at maureen(at)sys-con.com or paperboy(at)g2news.com, and by phone at 516 759-7025. Twitter: @MaureenOGara

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