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Local Backups vs. Cloud Backups

With the cloud becoming more and more popular for the public, a debate has popped up between cloud providers and cloud users

With the Cloud becoming more and more popular for the public, a debate has popped up between Cloud providers and Cloud users. That debate centers around the use of Local Data Backups vs. Cloud Data Backups. For the vast majority of companies and personal tech consumers, the idea of storing your critically needed data locally makes sense. Use an external hard drive. Set a reoccurring backup time on a daily basis. Forget about ever backing up your data ever again. However, with the Cloud becoming more accessible to private consumers and companies of all sizes, local data backups are giving way to Cloud backups. Here’s why.

The Problem with Local Backups

  1. Local Backups Require Personal Data Encryption – Here is the thing about using your own locally stored hard drive to backup all your critical business data – it’s unsafe. Unless you are an IT expert who knows how to properly secure your local hard drive with secureExternal Hard Drive - Local Backups encryption methods and security codes to make sure hackers can’t get in, your critical data is open to the world. For the personal user who only stores music files on their local external hard drive, a hacker doesn’t mean much. But for a company storing sensitive financial data or classified documents, security is a very real threat.

  2. Local Backups are Limited – A local external hard drive is a physical piece of equipment which takes up place on your desk and is limited to a storage capacity limit. Unable to grow from its stagnate state, a local external hard drive will not grow and scale with your company as you need more storage space for sensitive data. A local hard drive is 80gb, or 120gb, or 500gb. Once you reach that maximum potential, it’s time to purchase another hard drive. This might not seem like that big of a deal but for a company of any size, who shuffles through a ton of data on a daily basis, your local limit is going to be met and exceeded quickly. This will cause headaches and cost a lot of money.

  3. Local Backup Hardware Can Go Missing -Local backups performed via an external hard drive have a major built in security downfall. An external hard drive is easily stolen and can easily go missing. It’s not like your external hard drive is too heavy to move or is secured to your desk via a series of dead bolt locks. Just as easily as someone can pick pocket you while walking down the road, an external hard drive can easily be stolen and all the data siphoned off.

  4. External Hard Drive Security

  5. The Physical is a Pain -So, let’s say you have a position which requires you to travel around the globe on a constant basis. You travel for business meetings. You travel for trade shows. You travel for industry events. You travel for industry work shops and your travel because sometimes you need a vacation. With all this traveling, the last thing you want to do is have to lug an external hard drive around with you. Moreover, the last thing you want to do make potential clients wait for you to find the needed data in your external hard drive. External hard drives don’t make a great traveling partner.

The Benefits of Cloud Backups

    Cloud Backup Security

  1. Cloud Providers Take Care of Data Security – Unlike your locally stored external hard drive which may or may not be encrypted and may or may not have solid passkeys, when Cloud providers backup data they due so behind proven firewalls and encryption methods. Backing up data in the Cloud means your data has been secured behind a proven, checked and updated firewall with IT experts constantly checking to ensure its strength. Although giving your sensitive data to a Cloud provider might make you uneasy, there is no need to worry, Cloud backups are safer than locally stored backups.
  2. Scalability is Key – Yes, scalability. The ability of a solution to grow – or to scale – with your needs. Unlike the external hard drive sitting on your desk, when you reach the storage capacity limit of your chosen Cloud solution, the solution scales to meet your needs. No more continually buying new hard drives. No more worrying about what data is stored on what hard drive. With Cloud backups and storage, your data is held safely in one easy to access solution.
  3. Nothing Gets Lost – Unlike your external hard drive, data backed up in the Cloud doesn’t simply walk off and go missing. Data stored in the Cloud is held in one secure location, always accessible to users who have the proper credentials and access keys. With Cloud backed up data, your data has no chance of just walking off and getting lost.
  4. Your Data Is Everywhere, Always – The best thing about Cloud backed up data, is where ever you go, your needed data is Cloud Backup Scalabilitythere waiting. As long as you have the keys to access the data and a solid Internet connection, your data is there when you need it. Travel as much as you’d like. Go as far as you’d like. Your data will be there, waiting and ready for you to access it. Whether by way of an application like Dropbox or Cloud storage apps like Box.net, your data will be ready and accessible regardless of your physical location.

Can your local external hard drive boast all that? Can your home solution match up to multilevel online backup plans and enterprise Cloud backup solutions? We didn’t think so.

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