Welcome!

@CloudExpo Authors: Roger Strukhoff, Yeshim Deniz, Pat Romanski, Zakia Bouachraoui, Elizabeth White

Related Topics: @CloudExpo, Microservices Expo, Containers Expo Blog, Agile Computing, Government Cloud, @DXWorldExpo, SDN Journal

@CloudExpo: Article

IBM Wins Its Largest U.S. Cloud-Computing Contract

The agreement shows that “IBM’s ability to help governments transform with new technologies, like cloud, continue to grow”

That's one big check for Big Blue.

IBM won a federal cloud-computing contract with a maximum value of $1 billion, its largest such agreement with the U.S. government, according to an article on Bloomberg.com.

The Interior Department awarded similar, 10-year pacts to nine other suppliers, including Lockheed Martin Corp. (LMT), which also described the agreement as its largest federal cloud contract.

The deals might reach a combined $10 billion, allowing the agency to speed its efforts to move information to the cloud, a Web-based pool of shared resources such as data storage and software. Other U.S. departments may eventually tap the program.

The agreement shows that "IBM's ability to help governments transform with new technologies, like cloud, continue to grow," Michael Rowinski, a spokesman for the Armonk, New York-based company, said in an e-mail yesterday.

The award is a coup following IBM's loss to Amazon.com Inc. in the competition for a four-year, $600 million cloud contract with the Central Intelligence Agency. IBM may get another chance at that business following a successful protest to a federal office that arbitrates contract disputes.

The Interior Department's awards are "central to transforming our overall IT capabilities, which we expect to result in benefits of $100 million each year from 2016 to 2020," said Andrew Jackson, the agency's deputy assistant secretary for technology, information and business services.

"The approach we've chosen also allows us to speed up our acquisition process, which in turn allows us to leverage this technology more quickly," Jackson said in a blog posting on the department's website.

Cloud Computing Inspires Rethinking of Disaster Recovery
By definition, nothing good ever comes from a disaster. There's the physical destruction of property, the emotional toll of trying to bring order to chaos and, in terms of business concerns, the loss of information.

Fortunately, there are ways to limit the impact a disaster has on a business. Cloud computing gives organizations the opportunity to rethink many traditional IT practices, but it may be a particularly good fit for disaster recovery and business continuity.

Network World's Editor in Chief John Dix recently discussed the subject of disaster recovery with IBM Distinguished Engineer Richard Cocchiara, CTO and managing partner of Consulting for IBM's Business Continuity & Resiliency Services, for his perspective on the subject. Cocchiara leads a worldwide team who work with clients on systems availability, disaster recovery planning, business continuity management and IT governance.

One of the questions posed, according to an article on NetworkWorld.com, was "what are the different roles cloud can play in disaster recovery and business continuity?"

Probably the most basic thing is backing up data offsite. Most large companies have some sort of a backup strategy, but more often than you might think companies that are not sending their data offsite or not sending it far enough offsite. When asked if they have checked to see what potential regional issues they might have, sometimes they find some geological or weather or some other type of potential risk that would affect their ability to recover locally. Cloud gives them the ability to store data some place remote, store it online and to typically recover faster than from tape.

Read more on their discussion here.

Facebook Looking to Connect the Next 5 Billion People
Mark Zuckerberg might need a bigger book in which to keep his new friends.

Facebook, Ericsson, Mediatek, Opera Software, Samsung, Nokia and Qualcomm have joined to form Internet.org, an organization focused on making the Internet available to 5 billion more people, according to an article on eWEEK.com.

Currently, 2.7 billion people, or just more than one-third of the world's population, have access to the Internet, and so tools that enhance our lives, grow our worlds, and boost our personal and national incomes. Bringing those same opportunities to others around the world "is one of the greatest challenges of our generation," Mark Zuckerberg, Facebook's 29-year-old CEO, said in a position paper, Is Connectivity a Human Right?, that he posted to his Facebook page Aug. 20.

More Internet users will mean more Facebook users, yes. But it will also mean more jobs and more innovations. According to analysis from McKinsey, the Internet - and the knowledge economy it perpetuates, versus the industrial and resource-based economies people otherwise must compete in - creates 2.6 new jobs for every job lost to "gained efficiencies," said the paper.

More Stories By Patrick Burke

Patrick Burke is a writer and editor based in the greater New York area and occasionally blogs for Rackspace Hosting.

Comments (0)

Share your thoughts on this story.

Add your comment
You must be signed in to add a comment. Sign-in | Register

In accordance with our Comment Policy, we encourage comments that are on topic, relevant and to-the-point. We will remove comments that include profanity, personal attacks, racial slurs, threats of violence, or other inappropriate material that violates our Terms and Conditions, and will block users who make repeated violations. We ask all readers to expect diversity of opinion and to treat one another with dignity and respect.


CloudEXPO Stories
As you know, enterprise IT conversation over the past year have often centered upon the open-source Kubernetes container orchestration system. In fact, Kubernetes has emerged as the key technology -- and even primary platform -- of cloud migrations for a wide variety of organizations. Kubernetes is critical to forward-looking enterprises that continue to push their IT infrastructures toward maximum functionality, scalability, and flexibility. As they do so, IT professionals are also embracing the reality of Serverless architectures, which are critical to developing and operating real-time applications and services. Serverless is particularly important as enterprises of all sizes develop and deploy Internet of Things (IoT) initiatives.
Signs of a shift in the usage of public clouds are everywhere. Previously, as organizations outgrew old IT methods, the natural answer was to try the public cloud approach; however, the public platform alone is not a complete solution. Complaints include unpredictable/escalating costs and mounting security concerns in the public cloud. Ultimately, public cloud adoption can ultimately mean a shift of IT pains instead of a resolution. That's why the move to hybrid, custom, and multi-cloud will become more and more prevalent. At the heart of this technology trend exists a custom solution to meet the needs and concerns of enterprise organizations, including compliance, security, and cost issues. The "new normal" of enterprise clients is a world of hybrid and multi-cloud solutions, and it is slowly changing the IT technology landscape. Better tools, better management, and easier adoption a...
The Japan External Trade Organization (JETRO) is a non-profit organization that provides business support services to companies expanding to Japan. With the support of JETRO's dedicated staff, clients can incorporate their business; receive visa, immigration, and HR support; find dedicated office space; identify local government subsidies; get tailored market studies; and more.
While a hybrid cloud can ease that transition, designing and deploy that hybrid cloud still offers challenges for organizations concerned about lack of available cloud skillsets within their organization. Managed service providers offer a unique opportunity to fill those gaps and get organizations of all sizes on a hybrid cloud that meets their comfort level, while delivering enhanced benefits for cost, efficiency, agility, mobility, and elasticity.
Signs of a shift in the usage of public clouds are everywhere Previously, as organizations outgrew old IT methods, the natural answer was to try the public cloud approach; however, the public platform alone is not a complete solutionThe move to hybrid, custom, and multi-cloud will become more and more prevalent At the heart of this technology trend exists a custom solution to meet the needs and concerns of these organizations, including compliance, security, and cost issues Blending Service and Deployment Models