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Cloud Storage Adoption Gaining Among Businesses

With businesses facing the prospect of running out of storage capacity, adoption of cloud storage technologies continues to grow

Talk about TMI.

Cloud computing is helping businesses combat a growing problem: Too much information and not enough storage capacity, according to an article on eWEEK.com.

With businesses increasingly facing the prospect of running out of storage capacity, adoption of cloud storage technologies continues to grow, according to a report from cloud-integrated storage solutions specialist TwinStrata.

The survey found that 37 percent of respondents have been using cloud computing for three or more years, more than a one-third increase over last year's 27 percent number. When compared with last year's survey, overall adoption of cloud services has steadily increased across all categories, with use of Software as a Service (SaaS) reaching as high as 62 percent and both cloud storage and infrastructure as a service (IaaS) edging closer to 50 percent adoption rates. Platform as a Service (PaaS) experienced the greatest increase in adoption as more organizations become increasingly comfortable with the cloud, the report indicated.

"Overall, we find all cloud initiatives reaching greater levels of maturity. Last year, we found that more organizations intended to use Platform as a Service and cloud storage than had actually deployed them," the report said. "This year, we find that we've passed the tipping point - across all cloud initiatives, more people have actually deployed cloud services than plan to deploy them."

Cloud Technologies Revenue Will Reach $22.6B by 2016
Cloud computing is moving up and to the right.

A recent report indicates cloud computing is expected to bring in some impressive financial figures through 2016, according to an article on Forbes.com.

Market Monitor, a service of 451 Research, recently released its annual forecast of virtualization, security and automation and management revenue through 2016.

Some key takeaways from the report, "Market Monitor Cloud-Enabling Technologies":

Cloud-Enabling Technologies, defined as virtualization, security and automation and management, global revenues will grow from $10.6B in 2012 to $22.6B in 2016, attaining a 21% Compound Annual Growth Rate (CAGR).

Cloud-as-a-Service revenues will grow from $5.7B in 2012 to $19.5B in 2016, attaining a 36% CAGR. Market Monitor defines Cloud-as-a-Service as externally delivered services, specifically third party, that are hosted and pay-as-you-go with the cloud being relied on as a service delivery and consumption model.

Army Intelligence Needs a Good ‘Cloud' to Save Lives
By enlisting the capabilities of a cloud system, the U.S. military could limit the potential of death and serious injury to combat troops, according to a recent article in the Washington Times.

The U.S. military's main battlefield intelligence processor, crucial to the war in Afghanistan, still lacks an element common to civilian computer networks - a cloud.

A cloud computing architecture would give intelligence analysts at different locations simultaneous and wider access to all sorts of data, be it satellite imagery or reports on Taliban informants, according to the Washington Times.

In theory, faster, more thorough intelligence products lead to success on the battlefield, such as identifying and disrupting insurgents planting improvised explosive devices - the No. 1 killer of U.S. troops in Afghanistan.

The Army's $28 billion "cloudless" processor - the Distributed Common Ground System, commonly called D-Sigs - has prompted congressional criticism. Rep. Duncan Hunter, California Republican and a Marine Corps war veteran, has pressed the Army to turn to commercially available computing products to address the deficiency and, in his words, "save lives."

Maj. Gen. Harold Greene, deputy for acquisition and systems management at Army headquarters, preaches patience.

"D-Sigs is an extremely complex program," Gen. Greene told The Washington Times. "It is exactly the right thing to do. It's trying to move from a number of single intelligence stovepipe systems into an enterprise solution. In the course of doing that, it is a highly complex and technical effort to make that migration. We have had some challenges. But we've overcome those challenges. I'm sure we will also have more work to do, but we are on a positive glide slope right now. And we have it in use across the Army."

More Stories By Patrick Burke

Patrick Burke is a writer and editor based in the greater New York area and occasionally blogs for Rackspace Hosting.

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