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If Data Storage Vendors Made Cars…

Consider the things we put up with on a daily basis because they have been understood and accepted as the status quo

Take a moment to consider the things we put up with on a daily basis because they have been understood and accepted as the status quo. Perhaps the old adage, “better the devil you know than the devil you don’t,” rings no truer than for traditional on-premise data storage systems. Sure, there have been numerous improvements in data storage over the years. Sure, the slower, capacity-limited storage systems of yesterday continue to be replaced by bigger, faster storage systems all the time — but has there really been much improvement to address the most common idiosyncrasies that have existed for so long?

flash car

While data storage systems and cars have very little in common, imagine what automobiles would be like if they suffered from the same constraints and requirements have become the accepted norm with storage systems. Quite simply, owning an automobile would be a vastly different experience. How different? Think about all the things you would need:

  • A replacement every three years regardless of whether you needed it or not, or risk your payment rising drastically
  • A second automobile housed in a distant garage that is seldom used, except in the case of disaster — and once you replace your primary car, you have to replace that second one, too, whether it’s ever been driven or not
  • A permanent auto mechanic who works in your house
  • A supply of spare parts in your garage as part of regular operation and maintenance
  • The ability to keep growing your garage space and driveway to hold more automobiles as you expand to an entire fleet
  • An expanding portion of your time transferring your belongings from old to new automobiles as part of a never-ending replacement process

Whether or not you agree with the premise of this analogy, the point remains that the requirements and constraints of managing data storage may suddenly seem unacceptable when applied to a more well-known context.

Of course, if you find the requirements of managing on-premise storage to be borderline absurd, consider the cloud as an alternative to on-premise data storage. In particular, cloud-integrated storage offers a way to manage storage without:

  • The need to replace systems on a regular basis
  • Dedicated and seldom used secondary sites for disaster recovery
  • Significant administration
  • A large inventory of spare parts (i.e. spare drives)
  • A constantly growing need for floor space

Are you bothered by the quirks associated with managing your on-premise data storage? If so, let us know what they are.

The post If data storage vendors made cars… appeared first on TwinStrata.

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More Stories By Nicos Vekiarides

Nicos Vekiarides is the Chief Executive Officer & Co-Founder of TwinStrata. He has spent over 20 years in enterprise data storage, both as a business manager and as an entrepreneur and founder in startup companies.

Prior to TwinStrata, he served as VP of Product Strategy and Technology at Incipient, Inc., where he helped deliver the industry's first storage virtualization solution embedded in a switch. Prior to Incipient, he was General Manager of the storage virtualization business at Hewlett-Packard. Vekiarides came to HP with the acquisition of StorageApps where he was the founding VP of Engineering. At StorageApps, he built a team that brought to market the industry's first storage virtualization appliance. Prior to StorageApps, he spent a number of years in the data storage industry working at Sun Microsystems and Encore Computer. At Encore, he architected and delivered Encore Computer's SP data replication products that were a key factor in the acquisition of Encore's storage division by Sun Microsystems.

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