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All-Consuming, All-Confusing

I’m going to help you figure out what these technologies are, and how your organization can utilize them

Ask two politically opposed people in any given country about the causes of the country’s problems, and guess what? Each will give you an answer filtered through their world-view. Through what they know, and what they believe. That is not to say one is right and one is wrong, both simply see things in the manner their background and experiences tell them is right.

We definitely live in interesting times. Server virtualization has just about reached saturation, application development is going through a wide range of changes from the return of automated testing to continuous integration and the other facets of DevOps, SDN is the next wonder of the world, once we agree what exactly it is capable of and where it fits best, cloud didn’t conquer the world, and people are still building physical datacenters, yet cloud offers solutions to some problems. And all of this is changing while IT staff has increased security concerns, projects are still rolling in, and every new solution or system takes even more man-hours to implement.

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If you ask a networking person – and I’ve had quite a bit of talking with networking people over the last few years – about DevOps, they’ll talk about automating network provisioning processes, SDN is either the greatest idea ever (software vendors), or the dumbest idea ever (hardware vendors). Ask them about cloud, and it’s all about the network functions – all of cloud’s woes are from utilizing a primarily (or singularly) software network, and the bright future of cloud is only possible if the network is completely redone to mirror historical networks.

Ask a systems administrator the same questions, and you will get completely different answers. SDN frees them from the network, cloud offers a good solutions to some problems, but isn’t likely to replace the datacenter any time soon, and DevOps is an opportunity to actually schedule time to automate things they’ve been meaning to automate for a long time.

And the list goes on. Process people think all of the above are about changing the culture. Security folks are getting involved in DevOps even though they’re pretty certain changes to things like firewall rules aren’t going to get changed without a human saying “yes, do that”, because more than jobs are on the line.

And do you know what? They’re all right, to some extent. The problem is that conflicting messages while IT is trying to figure out what all these things really are, and how a given technology can help them out can cause more confusion than the information imparted warrants.

So I’m going to spend a good long while here at my new blog home talking about all of the above. Not from the developer, or network admin, or systems admin, or process specialist perspective, though I have experience in all of those areas. I’m going to help you figure out what these technologies are, and how your organization can utilize them.

And I’ll definitely point out where they are unlikely to be of assistance to you. After all, that is one of the services we offer here at Ingrained Technology, and thus far, our clients have clearly told us “this needs to be talked about”.

And that’s enough for me.

Oh, and welcome to my new blog!

Looking for more? Try these links:

DevOps.com

SDN Central

Cloud Computing Magazine

Test Driven

Read the original blog entry...

More Stories By Don MacVittie

Don MacVittie is founder of Ingrained Technology, A technical advocacy and software development consultancy. He has experience in application development, architecture, infrastructure, technical writing,DevOps, and IT management. MacVittie holds a B.S. in Computer Science from Northern Michigan University, and an M.S. in Computer Science from Nova Southeastern University.

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