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Using Eclipse and WebLogic, Deploy to the Cloud

From On-Premise to Infrastructure as a Service

From On-Premise to Infrastructure as a Service

My first blog showed how to move to Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) using Tomcat. This blog will show how to do the same using WebLogic Server, deploying webapps via eclipse to a remote WebLogic instance running in the cloud.

Let’s say we plan to move our app to production on Amazon Elastic Cloud (EC2). We have already developed the application using eclipse and have tested it on WebLogic running locally. Now, we may want to test  our app on an EC2 environment before moving to production.

First, we need to obtain an EC2 cloud instance. To keep costs down, I selected the free offering which offers a 1GB Linux instance. This is sufficient to run a basic WebLogic installation.

Then, simply download the free WebLogic zip distribution available here: http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/middleware/fusion-middleware/downloads/index.html. Once downloaded, unzip it and then run the configure command located in the Oracle Home directory (configure.cmd, configure.sh). The program will prompt you for a username/password and then the WebLogic domain will come to a RUNNING state. Perform this on both the local and remote servers (though on the local server, you need to bring up the domain).

Then from my browser, I went to http://54.148.187.110:7001/console and tested that I can log into the WebLogic console.

Then, I configured eclipse on my Windows laptop. I used:

  • Eclipse Java EE IDE for Web Developers.
  • Version: Luna Service Release 1 (4.4.1)

I then installed the WebLogic plugin for eclipse. Go to Help->Eclipse Marketplace and search for WebLogic. Then install the plugin appropriate for the version of eclipse you are using (eg, Luna).

Using the same project we used for Tomcat (or any other dynamic web project), select the eclipse project in Project Explorer. Right-click, select Run As and select Run on Server. Select Oracle-> Oracle Weblogic Server 12c (12.1.3). Fill in the server’s host name and server name using the locally installed Weblogic. On the next screen, you will need to give the local Oracle Home and Java Home. On the following screen, select the Server type as remote and fill in the settings for the remote Weblogic running on EC2, such as the following:

Once the webapp is successfully deployed, run the app from inside eclipse and you should see it running:

You can also see the app via your browser: http://54.148.187.110:7001/michael-project/myhello.jsp

Now, your webapp is running on WebLogic running in the cloud!

More Stories By Michael Meiner

Michael Meiner is an Engineering Director at Oracle Corporation. His organization is responsible for lifecycle Quality Assurance of the Fusion Middleware Suite of products, including: installation, configuration, upgrade, test-to-production and interoperability on a range of computing platforms and Operating Systems. The Fusion Middleware product suite supports both On-Premise as well as Cloud offerings.

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