Welcome!

@CloudExpo Authors: Elizabeth White, Zakia Bouachraoui, Liz McMillan, Yeshim Deniz, Pat Romanski

News Feed Item

Artificial Intelligence: A Practical Assessment - Reportlinker Review

Artificial Intelligence: A Practical Assessment

NEW YORK, Oct. 20, 2015 /PRNewswire/ -- Introduction

For many people, a future that includes artificial intelligence (AI) sounds just great, because it means helpful robots, self-driving cars, and virtual assistants instantly providing personalized information and guidance on any number of matters. Others worry that the robots and cars and assistants will become so smart that they stop following human directives, and chart their own future, perhaps without us. Somewhere in between, most rational people are interested enough in AI to want to know more about it, if only to satisfy their own curiosity, rather than determine whether they should embrace or fear it. AI is currently one of the most fascinating, as well as one of the most confusing, areas of development in the larger field of Big Data and analytics (BDA).

AI stimulates the imagination with visions of automating many human-like functions that have been historically beyond the reach of technology. What makes AI confusing is the variety and complexity of its methods, compounded by the recent tendency of BDA solution providers to apply the AI label to their analytic applications. Adding to the confusion are the strongly-held opinions of many AI researchers that are beginning to surface regarding its development. The mainstream media is not much help, as it typically addresses only the most sensational AI developments (e.g., Watson Wins Jeopardy! Elon Musk Fears the Singularity! )—and in only the most simplistic fashion. Attempting to learn more, one quickly encounters a formidable language barrier.

This AI language barrier rises up in the form of arcane terms like "Hierarchical Hidden Markov Models" and "Inverse Reinforcement Learning," which are the real names of two popular AI methods. People who can easily understand such terms tend to be those who read and write mathematical formulas, and who also understand concepts like stochastic processes and back propagation. The rest of us are left scratching our heads and looking for more accessible explanations of how AI does what it does, its current capabilities and limitations, and realistic assessments of how AI may be able to help or hurt us.

This week's SPIE is designed to help. Its purpose is to lead the reader around the AI hype and hoopla, past the impenetrable bog of specialized terminology and the deep pit of unnecessary detail, to a basic understanding of AI's capabilities and limitations; as well as an appreciation for the reasons why AI researchers are starting to raise concerns about the current trajectory of AI development. Finally, Stratecast suggests it is not too soon for business decision makers to begin assessing the extent to which AI should be factored into their own tactical and strategic business plans. The first order of business, however, is to briefly recap the historical developments that have brought AI to its current position.



Read the full report: http://www.reportlinker.com/p03180769-summary/view-report.html

About Reportlinker
ReportLinker is an award-winning market research solution. Reportlinker reviews, finds and organizes the latest industry data so you get all the market research you need - instantly, in one place.

http://www.reportlinker.com


__________________________
Contact Clare: [email protected]
US: (339)-368-6001
Intl: +1 339-368-6001

To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/artificial-intelligence-a-practical-assessment----reportlinker-review-300162990.html

SOURCE Reportlinker

More Stories By PR Newswire

Copyright © 2007 PR Newswire. All rights reserved. Republication or redistribution of PRNewswire content is expressly prohibited without the prior written consent of PRNewswire. PRNewswire shall not be liable for any errors or delays in the content, or for any actions taken in reliance thereon.

CloudEXPO Stories
The Internet of Things will challenge the status quo of how IT and development organizations operate. Or will it? Certainly the fog layer of IoT requires special insights about data ontology, security and transactional integrity. But the developmental challenges are the same: People, Process and Platform and how we integrate our thinking to solve complicated problems. In his session at 19th Cloud Expo, Craig Sproule, CEO of Metavine, demonstrated how to move beyond today's coding paradigm and share the must-have mindsets for removing complexity from the development process, accelerate application delivery times, and ensure that developers will become heroes (not bottlenecks) in the IoT revolution.
CloudEXPO New York 2018, colocated with DXWorldEXPO New York 2018 will be held November 11-13, 2018, in New York City and will bring together Cloud Computing, FinTech and Blockchain, Digital Transformation, Big Data, Internet of Things, DevOps, AI, Machine Learning and WebRTC to one location.
DevOps with IBMz? You heard right. Maybe you're wondering what a developer can do to speed up the entire development cycle--coding, testing, source code management, and deployment-? In this session you will learn about how to integrate z application assets into a DevOps pipeline using familiar tools like Jenkins and UrbanCode Deploy, plus z/OSMF workflows, all of which can increase deployment speeds while simultaneously improving reliability. You will also learn how to provision mainframe system as cloud-like service.
The best way to leverage your Cloud Expo presence as a sponsor and exhibitor is to plan your news announcements around our events. The press covering Cloud Expo and @ThingsExpo will have access to these releases and will amplify your news announcements. More than two dozen Cloud companies either set deals at our shows or have announced their mergers and acquisitions at Cloud Expo. Product announcements during our show provide your company with the most reach through our targeted audiences.
What are the new priorities for the connected business? First: businesses need to think differently about the types of connections they will need to make – these span well beyond the traditional app to app into more modern forms of integration including SaaS integrations, mobile integrations, APIs, device integration and Big Data integration. It’s important these are unified together vs. doing them all piecemeal. Second, these types of connections need to be simple to design, adapt and configure. Plus, with the proliferation of IoT, there is an explosion in the number of devices requiring interconnection - both in terms of asset monitoring and spatial analytics.