Welcome!

@CloudExpo Authors: Liz McMillan, Zakia Bouachraoui, Elizabeth White, Pat Romanski, Carmen Gonzalez

Related Topics: Containers Expo Blog

Containers Expo Blog: Article

Virtualization Player Citrix Buys VMware's Open Source Rival for $500M

Citrix Buys VMware's Open Source Rival for $500m

The day after the great VMware IPO Tuesday, supposedly the hottest thing since Google went public, Citrix, a Microsoft camp follower with the scars to prove it, said it's acquiring VMware's open source commercial competitor, XenSource Inc, the company that developed Xen's chi-chi hypervisor.

It's paying about $500 million in cash and stock (60-40), a pricey number not all that different from the $635 million that EMC paid for VMware early in '04. But considering it's for an open source start-up not yet three-years-old with 80 people and under $5 million in annual revenues, it's rich.

The price includes the assumption of about $107 million in unvested stock options to hold people and the deal will result in an $8 million-$10 million write-off for in-process R&D.

Obviously Citrix expects the merger to move it and its thin client-style software, which reflects applications running on the server onto the desktop - a specialty under pressure by virtualization - into the adjacent server and desktop virtualization game, calculated to grow to nearly $5 billion over the next four years, and put maybe 30 million office workers on virtual desktops in the next five years.

That being the case, Citrix expects XenSource to advance its own application delivery business by adding key enablers that push to virtualize the logic and data tiers of applications. It's promising to make the solutions cheaper and less complicated.

Citrix figures the acquisition strengthens its partnership with Microsoft. See, XenSource, which works on Windows, has access to Microsoft's hypervisor virtualization widgetry, code named Viridian and due out in 3Q08.

And Citrix did manage to wheedle a ra-ra quote from Microsoft senior VP, servers & tools Bob Muglia for its announcement. Maybe that means Microsoft will use some of Xen in Viridian or, according to The 451 Group's musings, maybe just up and buy Citrix.

The 451 folks figure Viridian becomes the "base operating system for its next business," as it borrowed from Microsoft to start its original business, and "save a couple of years development time by buying XenSource to get into the virtualization market."

The acquisition of XenSource and its 650 customers, a number that reportedly doubled in the last 90 days, is supposed to close in Q4. Citrix then intends to create a Virtualization & Management Division to house it led by XenSource CEO Peter Levine. He will report to Citrix president and CEO Mark Templeton.

In a canned quote, Levine said, "This move is not about competing for the 5% of the market that is already being served. It's about steering into the 90% white space that is wide open, both at the server and in the new emerging opportunities at the desktop."

The shiny new rev of XenSource's version of Xen, XenEnterprise 4, due to ship on August 20, adds mobility, monitoring and storage integration and 64-bit support good for SQL and Exchange 2007. It can now handle physical systems with 128GB of memory and offer guest operating systems 32GB of space, accommodating a physical CPU limit of an eight-way server, better than what VMware can manage.

When the new cut was announced Monday, XenSource was already thinking about melding it with Citrix' Desktop Server and about helping Citrix Desktop Server deliver desktops from the data center as a secure on-demand service.

Citrix intends to push XenSource through its 5,000 channel partners and leverage its relationships with server and data center infrastructure folks, like Symantec with its Veritas storage interests, to create additional routes to market through OEM sales channels.

Citrix says it will continue to contribute to the Xen open source project that's led by XenSource co-founder Ian Pratt but between now and when the deal closes, they're going to try to develop procedures for independent oversight of the project. Both Novell and Red Hat include Xen.

Citrix said the acquisition will add $1 million in revenue and roughly $3 million in cost revenue and operating expenses to its 2007 fiscal year and $50 million in revenue and $60 million-$70 million in total cost of revenues and operating expense to its 2008 fiscal year.

XenSource was backed to the tune of $41.5 million by Sevin Rosen, Ignition Partners, New Enterprise Associates, Accel Partners and Kleiner Perkins, a prestige lot.

VMware has been awarded 85% of the market and then there's Virtual Iron.

More Stories By Virtualization News

SYS-CON's Virtualization News Desk trawls the news sources of the world for the latest details of virtualization technologies, products, and market trends, and provides breaking news updates from the Virtualization Conference & Expo.

Comments (1)

Share your thoughts on this story.

Add your comment
You must be signed in to add a comment. Sign-in | Register

In accordance with our Comment Policy, we encourage comments that are on topic, relevant and to-the-point. We will remove comments that include profanity, personal attacks, racial slurs, threats of violence, or other inappropriate material that violates our Terms and Conditions, and will block users who make repeated violations. We ask all readers to expect diversity of opinion and to treat one another with dignity and respect.


CloudEXPO Stories
ScaleMP is presenting at CloudEXPO 2019, held June 24-26 in Santa Clara, and we’d love to see you there. At the conference, we’ll demonstrate how ScaleMP is solving one of the most vexing challenges for cloud — memory cost and limit of scale — and how our innovative vSMP MemoryONE solution provides affordable larger server memory for the private and public cloud. Please visit us at Booth No. 519 to connect with our experts and learn more about vSMP MemoryONE and how it is already serving some of the world’s largest data centers. Click here to schedule a meeting with our experts and executives.
At CloudEXPO Silicon Valley, June 24-26, 2019, Digital Transformation (DX) is a major focus with expanded DevOpsSUMMIT and FinTechEXPO programs within the DXWorldEXPO agenda. Successful transformation requires a laser focus on being data-driven and on using all the tools available that enable transformation if they plan to survive over the long term. A total of 88% of Fortune 500 companies from a generation ago are now out of business. Only 12% still survive. Similar percentages are found throughout enterprises of all sizes.
When you're operating multiple services in production, building out forensics tools such as monitoring and observability becomes essential. Unfortunately, it is a real challenge balancing priorities between building new features and tools to help pinpoint root causes. Linkerd provides many of the tools you need to tame the chaos of operating microservices in a cloud native world. Because Linkerd is a transparent proxy that runs alongside your application, there are no code changes required. It even comes with Prometheus to store the metrics for you and pre-built Grafana dashboards to show exactly what is important for your services - success rate, latency, and throughput.
In his general session at 21st Cloud Expo, Greg Dumas, Calligo’s Vice President and G.M. of US operations, discussed the new Global Data Protection Regulation and how Calligo can help business stay compliant in digitally globalized world. Greg Dumas is Calligo's Vice President and G.M. of US operations. Calligo is an established service provider that provides an innovative platform for trusted cloud solutions. Calligo’s customers are typically most concerned about GDPR compliance, application performance guarantees & data privacy.
Modern software design has fundamentally changed how we manage applications, causing many to turn to containers as the new virtual machine for resource management. As container adoption grows beyond stateless applications to stateful workloads, the need for persistent storage is foundational - something customers routinely cite as a top pain point. In his session at @DevOpsSummit at 21st Cloud Expo, Bill Borsari, Head of Systems Engineering at Datera, explored how organizations can reap the benefits of the cloud without losing performance as containers become the new paradigm.