Welcome!

@CloudExpo Authors: Pat Romanski, Zakia Bouachraoui, Liz McMillan, Elizabeth White, Stackify Blog

Related Topics: @CloudExpo, Containers Expo Blog

@CloudExpo: Article

Cloud Computing: It's the Future of Enterprise IT

Every enterprise will have one or more "clouds" into which they deploy applications

Sam Charrington's "In the Loop" Blog

We're still relatively early in the cloud computing hype cycle but I strongly believe that in the future, most if not all server-side software applications will be deployed in a cloud-computing-like manner. That is not to say that all applications will be run in one of exactly five global clouds. On the contrary, every enterprise will have one or more 'clouds' into which they deploy applications.

James Urquhart recently posed a question that had been on my mind as well:

  • If "grid computing" is about running job-based tasks in a MPP model (e.g. HPC)...
  • If "utility computing" is a business model for providing computing on an as-needed, bill-for-what-you-use basis...
  • If "cloud computing" is a market model describing services provided over the Internet...
  • If "virtualization" describes providing software layers in the execution stack...
  • Then, what do we call the systems/infrastructure model where resources are pooled together, and used for a variety of workloads, including both job-based and "always running" tasks (such as web applications, management and monitoring applications, security applications, etc.)?

[SBC: Edited for length and emphasis]

 

To which I responded:

"It's my belief that the future model for providing IT infrastructure and services in large organizations will very much resemble what you describe and what many call cloud computing, but will occur behind the firewall. I've got a talk on just this topic at the Next Generation Data Center conference in August.

I've used the term "application fabric" for the resource pooling model you describe. One of the things I like about it is that it connotes the flexibility of the model relative to traditional siloed approaches.
That said,I've used other terms as well. Gartner has coined a term "grid-based application platform" that I like, but I think it speaks more to the upper end of the stack (e.g. distributed app platform/server) moreso than the entire model.

I tend not to like the "utility..." terms as much, because I think they highlight a 3rd party or Internet-delivered aspect which is orthogonal to what we want to focus on here. I understand that it doesn't have to be that way--the organization providing the utility service can be within the same company--but I find that the Public Utility metaphor is too powerful to be easily overcome."

 

Cloud computing: the future of enterprise IT

We're still relatively early in the cloud computing hype cycle but, as mentioned above, I strongly believe that in the future, most if not all server-side software applications will be deployed in a cloud-computing-like manner.

That is not to say that all applications will be run in one of exactly five global clouds. (That was Sun's idea, which they called Redshift, discussed on Bob Lozano's blog here, here, and here.) On the contrary, every enterprise will have one or more "clouds" into which they deploy applications.

So, what do we call it?

So, what do we call cloud computing within the enterprise? While it may not be the most important question that needs to be addressed, it's certainly an interesting and worthwhile one. And, in some cases amusing:

So it's a cloud, but instead of being far away it's near? Isn't that Fog? :-)
--Ray Nugent

 

One idea I've tossed out is Intra-Cloud, but I'm not betting on that one. (Neither is Bob; he immediately and violently puked all over it. ;-)

I'm interested in hearing what you think... Any ideas?

More Stories By Samuel Charrington

Samuel Charrington is VP of Product Management & Marketing at Appistry. Formerly, he was an early employee at Plumtree Software, where he made pivotal contributions in a variety of sales and marketing roles as the company grew from pre-revenue to over $80 million in annual income. Most recently, as Director of Business Development, he was responsible for defining and executing the company's technology partnering strategy. Previously, Charrington held sales and marketing positions in AT&T's Business Multimedia Systems organization.

Comments (3)

Share your thoughts on this story.

Add your comment
You must be signed in to add a comment. Sign-in | Register

In accordance with our Comment Policy, we encourage comments that are on topic, relevant and to-the-point. We will remove comments that include profanity, personal attacks, racial slurs, threats of violence, or other inappropriate material that violates our Terms and Conditions, and will block users who make repeated violations. We ask all readers to expect diversity of opinion and to treat one another with dignity and respect.


CloudEXPO Stories
Docker and Kubernetes are key elements of modern cloud native deployment automations. After building your microservices, common practice is to create docker images and create YAML files to automate the deployment with Docker and Kubernetes. Writing these YAMLs, Dockerfile descriptors are really painful and error prone.Ballerina is a new cloud-native programing language which understands the architecture around it - the compiler is environment aware of microservices directly deployable into infrastructures like Docker and Kubernetes.
DevOps is under attack because developers don’t want to mess with infrastructure. They will happily own their code into production, but want to use platforms instead of raw automation. That’s changing the landscape that we understand as DevOps with both architecture concepts (CloudNative) and process redefinition (SRE). Rob Hirschfeld’s recent work in Kubernetes operations has led to the conclusion that containers and related platforms have changed the way we should be thinking about DevOps and controlling infrastructure. The rise of Site Reliability Engineering (SRE) is part of that redefinition of operations vs development roles in organizations.
Signs of a shift in the usage of public clouds are everywhere Previously, as organizations outgrew old IT methods, the natural answer was to try the public cloud approach; however, the public platform alone is not a complete solutionThe move to hybrid, custom, and multi-cloud will become more and more prevalent At the heart of this technology trend exists a custom solution to meet the needs and concerns of these organizations, including compliance, security, and cost issues Blending Service and Deployment Models
When a company wants to develop an application, it must worry about many aspects: selecting the infrastructure, building the technical stack, defining the storage strategy, configuring networks, setting up monitoring and logging, and on top of that, the company needs to worry about high availability, flexibility, scalability, data processing, machine learning, etc. Going to the cloud infrastructure can help you solving these problems to a level, but what if we have a better way to do things. As a pioneer in serverless notion, Google Cloud offers a complete platform for each of those necessities letting users to just write code, send messages, assign jobs, build models, and gain insights without deploying a single machine. So cloud compute on its own is not enough, we need to think about all of the pieces we need to move architecture from the bottom, up towards the top of the stack. Wi...
Cloud-Native thinking and Serverless Computing are now the norm in financial services, manufacturing, telco, healthcare, transportation, energy, media, entertainment, retail and other consumer industries, as well as the public sector. The widespread success of cloud computing is driving the DevOps revolution in enterprise IT. Now as never before, development teams must communicate and collaborate in a dynamic, 24/7/365 environment. There is no time to wait for long development cycles that produce software that is obsolete at launch. DevOps may be disruptive, but it is essential. DevOpsSUMMIT at CloudEXPO expands the DevOps community, enable a wide sharing of knowledge, and educate delegates and technology providers alike.