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Citrix CEO "The Industry Needs Time"

"Customers need the time to get comfortable with it and all that's different from the proprietary model," adds Mark Templeton

Read SYS-CON's Exclusive Q&A with Citrix CTO Simon Crosby

Referring to Cloud Computing, Citrix CEO Mark Templeton has said that "Customers need the time to get comfortable with it and all that's different from the proprietary model, and the industry needs time to make it consumable." Templeton was speaking to a reporter at the Citrix iForum 2008 in Edinburgh, Scotland.

Templeton, 55, is President, Chief Executive Officer and a Director for Citrix, a $1.4 billion leader in application delivery infrastructure operating in over 100 countries.

He joined Citrix as Vice President of Marketing in 1995, when Citrix had $95 million in revenue and went public.  He has served as President since January 1998 and as Chief Executive Officer from June 2001 to the present.

Under Templeton’s leadership, Citrix has become one of the world’s top technology companies. In the 1990s, he was responsible for Citrix’s marketing strategy in server-based computing, a strategy based on the company’s ground-breaking application virtualization technology,  helping the company to achieve market leadership with approximately 80 percent market share.

Over the past few years, Templeton has led the evolution of Citrix from a company with a single product, customer segment, and go-to-market path to a global powerhouse with multiple products, business models, customer segments, and go-to-market channels. In that time, Citrix has also grown to more than 4,600 employees who help more than 210,000 organizations worldwide – including all of the Fortune 100 and 99 percent of the Fortune Global 500. In the process, Citrix revenues have grown from $527 million in 2002 to $1.4 billion in 2007.

More Stories By Jeremy Geelan

Jeremy Geelan is Chairman & CEO of the 21st Century Internet Group, Inc. and an Executive Academy Member of the International Academy of Digital Arts & Sciences. Formerly he was President & COO at Cloud Expo, Inc. and Conference Chair of the worldwide Cloud Expo series. He appears regularly at conferences and trade shows, speaking to technology audiences across six continents. You can follow him on twitter: @jg21.

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