Welcome!

@CloudExpo Authors: Pat Romanski, Zakia Bouachraoui, Yeshim Deniz, Liz McMillan, Elizabeth White

Related Topics: Containers Expo Blog, @CloudExpo

Containers Expo Blog: Article

Cloud Computing or Grid Computing - Which Comes First?

Some would have you believe that cloud computing is either a fancy name for, or a part of, grid computing

Justin Davies' Blog

Grid computing is scalable (that is, make it big or small according to your needs) computing power, usually used by businesses. And supplied via the web. Cloud computing is a method of supplying technology on demand. Who cares where it comes from, or even what it’s called? So long as it’s there when you need it. That’s why services as basic as web-based email are also forms of cloud computing.

Cloud Computing v. Grid Computing: the chicken or the egg? I’m guessing it’s actually a matter of ‘who cares?’ Although some purists might gnash their teeth to hear that!

But if I had to answer it, I’d say it’s not actually a question of what came first. It’s more a question of which is a subset of which.

In my opinion, grid computing is a kind or subset of cloud computing. Grid computing is scalable (that is, make it big or small according to your needs) computing power, usually used by businesses. And supplied via the web.

It’s a way of tapping into extra computing power in ‘times of need.’ Say you need to do a mass mailout of a large document once a month (think: a pdf newsletter). Just tap into the power of someone else’s grid for the day and off it goes in the blink of an eye – rather than tying up your servers for the next 12 hours. Of course you pay for it. AAmazon Elastic Cloud Compute offers this service (although they seem to be hijacking the name cloud computing), as does GoGrid (who are, btw, not affiliated with GoPC).

All very interesting, but how does this relate to cloud computing?

Some would have you believe that cloud computing is either a fancy name for, or a part of, grid computing. Others go into infinite detail to categorise various providers WITHIN the cloud computing realm. (Actually, we think cloud computing encompasses grid computing, but that’s beside the point.)

This is because cloud computing as a term is still up for grabs. Purists can argue until they’re blue in the face, but the fact is that cloud computing will encompass whatever the people say it encompasses. Whatever works best and hits the market first and touches the public heart in the most widespread manner.

Best to keep definitions broad, then. Cloud computing is computing power offered via the web - something you can tap into without knowing or caring how it works. You just want to know THAT it works. And therein lies the principle of cloud computing.

Services, platforms, power, apps, hosting, etc you can pick out of the cloud that is the internet. A cloud is fuzzy, misty, obscure and opaque - but that’s okay because it’s not about how or why it works. It only matters that it works and you can access it anywhere, anytime.

Cloud computing is a method of supplying technology on demand. Who cares where it comes from, or even what it’s called? So long as it’s there when you need it. That’s why services as basic as web-based email are also forms of cloud computing. It’s just that, as the services expand, we are now finding it necessary to have a name for this stuff. And just in time, because the expansion it’s undergoing is nothing short of phenomenal.

More Stories By Justin Davies

Justin Davies is Head of Marketing at GoPC.Net, in which role he assists GoPC to create and expand into the growing and emerging market of cloud computing.

Comments (0)

Share your thoughts on this story.

Add your comment
You must be signed in to add a comment. Sign-in | Register

In accordance with our Comment Policy, we encourage comments that are on topic, relevant and to-the-point. We will remove comments that include profanity, personal attacks, racial slurs, threats of violence, or other inappropriate material that violates our Terms and Conditions, and will block users who make repeated violations. We ask all readers to expect diversity of opinion and to treat one another with dignity and respect.


CloudEXPO Stories
Headquartered in Plainsboro, NJ, Synametrics Technologies has provided IT professionals and computer systems developers since 1997. Based on the success of their initial product offerings (WinSQL and DeltaCopy), the company continues to create and hone innovative products that help its customers get more from their computer applications, databases and infrastructure. To date, over one million users around the world have chosen Synametrics solutions to help power their accelerated business or personal computing needs.
DXWorldEXPO LLC announced today that the upcoming DXWorldEXPO | DevOpsSUMMIT | CloudEXPO New York will feature 10 companies from Poland to participate at the "Poland Digital Transformation Pavilion" on November 12-13, 2018. Polish Digital Transformation companies which will exhibit at CloudEXPO | DevOpsSUMMIT | DXWorldEXPO include All in Mobile, dhosting, Cryptomage, Perfect Gym, Polcom, Apius Technologies, Aplisens, ELZAB SA, TELDAT, and Rebug.io.
Digital Transformation and Disruption, Amazon Style - What You Can Learn. Chris Kocher is a co-founder of Grey Heron, a management and strategic marketing consulting firm. He has 25+ years in both strategic and hands-on operating experience helping executives and investors build revenues and shareholder value. He has consulted with over 130 companies on innovating with new business models, product strategies and monetization. Chris has held management positions at HP and Symantec in addition to advisory roles at startups. He has worked extensively on monetization, SAAS, IoT, ecosystems, partnerships and accelerating growth in new business initiatives.
Lori MacVittie is a subject matter expert on emerging technology responsible for outbound evangelism across F5's entire product suite. MacVittie has extensive development and technical architecture experience in both high-tech and enterprise organizations, in addition to network and systems administration expertise. Prior to joining F5, MacVittie was an award-winning technology editor at Network Computing Magazine where she evaluated and tested application-focused technologies including app security and encryption-related solutions. She holds a B.S. in Information and Computing Science from the University of Wisconsin at Green Bay, and an M.S. in Computer Science from Nova Southeastern University, and is an O'Reilly author.
Dynatrace is an application performance management software company with products for the information technology departments and digital business owners of medium and large businesses. Building the Future of Monitoring with Artificial Intelligence. Today we can collect lots and lots of performance data. We build beautiful dashboards and even have fancy query languages to access and transform the data. Still performance data is a secret language only a couple of people understand. The more business becomes digital the more stakeholders are interested in this data including how it relates to business. Some of these people have never used a monitoring tool before. They have a question on their mind like "How is my application doing" but no idea how to get a proper answer.