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Will Cloud Computing Mean Fewer IT Jobs?

Will companies reduce headcount within their infrastructure and application development groups?

Jordan Haberfield's "Agile Elephant" Blog

Cloud computing is bringing a new dynamic to the way companies are managing their infrastructure. One of the fall-offs from a move to the clouds is the potential ability for companies to reduce headcount within its infrastructure and application development groups.

The advent of cloud computing is bringing a new dynamic to the way companies are managing their infrastructure. This, in turn, creates a new corporate strategy for managing talent.

There is still quite a bit of discussion regarding whether or not the cloud is an IT revolution. Companies such as Amazon, Google and Microsoft are betting big on its complete adoption. And who can blame them? The reduced start-up costs, reduced capital investment, rapid scalability, access to diverse development platforms and the ability to have a flexible and powerful computing platform with a variable cost structure and no long term commitment...this, in my opinion, is certainly the future.

One of the fall-offs from a move to the clouds is the potential ability for companies to reduce headcount within its infrastructure and application development groups. I would like to hear from others who have experience in the cloud and find out if they are seeing a reduction in workforce. In my opinion, this is one of the cost savings of moving applications to the cloud. But let's not forget that this strategy comes with other costs. The monthly charges alone can add up if you are managing large-scale projects. But I would suspect that these prices will diminish over time and provide even more cost-effective solutions.

If you have experience working with a company that works in the cloud, I'd like to hear your opinions as to its effect on headcount.

If you are interested in learning more about how you can leverage the cloud in your company, contact me for a consultative session.


[This appeared originally here and is republished by kind permission of the author.]

More Stories By Jordan Haberfield

Jordan Haberfield is SVP, Information Technology Staffing at System One Holdings. He participates in all phases of the business, including strategic and financial planning, but is most active in maintaining strong client and partner relationships while also spearheading System One’s sales, recruiting and executive search efforts

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