Welcome!

@CloudExpo Authors: Liz McMillan, Elizabeth White, Zakia Bouachraoui, Pat Romanski, Yeshim Deniz

Related Topics: @CloudExpo, Microservices Expo, Agile Computing

@CloudExpo: Article

Ten Key Reasons Enterprise Cloud Computing Is Going Places

The Cloud is collaborative and integrating - you can mash up new technologies with the help of cloud computing

Angsuman Chakraborty's Enterprise Blog

Cloud computing isn’t about doing anything new, instead it’s about applications that run in the web rather than your desktop. Some technology experts define CLOUD as follows: Common, Location-independent, Online Utility provisioned on-Demand.

As per my analysis, the key factors favoring Enterprise Cloud Computing are:

  • Factor #1: The growing need of extremely powerful forms of end user computing  such as complex modeling and simulation, and data analytics are on the rise dramatically in the last few years. Many of the tasks can be performed by remotely located computing power and the sophisticated software that the typical enterprise IT set up did not.
  • Factor #2: The users desperately need processing cycles, data storage now-a-days for high degree of computation. Since, the communication bandwidth is limited and expensive, we need processing cycle and data storage as close as possible. Cloud Computing fits in this category.
  • Factor #3: On Demand allocation and de-allocation of CPU, storage and network bandwidth makes cloud computing more appealing to end users.
  • Factor #4: Having hosting facilities on net — that is, in the same locations as core network of switching and routing facilities — eliminates extra expenses to reach a third-party datacenter. Integrated providers also can access network facilities at cost, rather than at market prices.
  • Factor #5: Energy costs and climate change are the crucial deciding factors to choose the location of data center. Cloud Computing satisfies that goal.
  • Factor #6: The Cloud is collaborative and integrating.  You can mash up new technologies with the help of cloud computing and incorporate disparate group of communities like customers, suppliers, interest groups.
  • Factor #7: Cloud Computing is cost effective and provides better pricing model.
  • Factor #8: It’s not just sales, but also after-sales service and support, including: lifecycle management teams ensures successful service delivery on 24/7 basis.
  • Factor #9: Provides advanced tooling for service monitoring and management; portals for network and application performance.
  • Factor #10: Cloud Computing offers vendor independence. Service providers are strategically keen on reaching as wide market as possible because customer base have wide range of requirements and preferences.

    and one for luck:
  • Factor #11: Security typically improves due to centralization of data, increased security-focused resources, etc., but raises concerns about loss of control over certain sensitive data. Accesses are typically logged but accessing the audit logs themselves can be difficult or impossible.

More Stories By Angsuman Chakraborty

Angsuman Chakraborty is Founder and CEO of Taragana Inc. He blogs at blog.taragana.com and at enterpriseblog.net.

Comments (0)

Share your thoughts on this story.

Add your comment
You must be signed in to add a comment. Sign-in | Register

In accordance with our Comment Policy, we encourage comments that are on topic, relevant and to-the-point. We will remove comments that include profanity, personal attacks, racial slurs, threats of violence, or other inappropriate material that violates our Terms and Conditions, and will block users who make repeated violations. We ask all readers to expect diversity of opinion and to treat one another with dignity and respect.


CloudEXPO Stories
Traditional on-premises data centers have long been the domain of modern data platforms like Apache Hadoop, meaning companies who build their business on public cloud were challenged to run Big Data processing and analytics at scale. But recent advancements in Hadoop performance, security, and most importantly cloud-native integrations, are giving organizations the ability to truly gain value from all their data. In his session at 19th Cloud Expo, David Tishgart, Director of Product Marketing at Cloudera, covered the ins and outs of Hadoop, and how it can help cloud-based businesses.
DevOpsSummit New York 2018, colocated with CloudEXPO | DXWorldEXPO New York 2018 will be held November 11-13, 2018, in New York City. Digital Transformation (DX) is a major focus with the introduction of DXWorldEXPO within the program. Successful transformation requires a laser focus on being data-driven and on using all the tools available that enable transformation if they plan to survive over the long term.
What are the new priorities for the connected business? First: businesses need to think differently about the types of connections they will need to make – these span well beyond the traditional app to app into more modern forms of integration including SaaS integrations, mobile integrations, APIs, device integration and Big Data integration. It’s important these are unified together vs. doing them all piecemeal. Second, these types of connections need to be simple to design, adapt and configure. Plus, with the proliferation of IoT, there is an explosion in the number of devices requiring interconnection - both in terms of asset monitoring and spatial analytics.
Jo Peterson is VP of Cloud Services for Clarify360, a boutique sourcing and benchmarking consultancy focused on transforming technology into business advantage. Clarify360 provides custom, end-to-end solutions from a portfolio of more than 170 suppliers globally. As an engineer, Jo sources net new technology footprints, and is an expert at optimizing and benchmarking existing environments focusing on Cloud Enablement and Optimization. She and her team work with clients on Cloud Discovery, Cloud Planning, Cloud Migration, Hybrid IT Architectures ,Cloud Optimization and Cloud Security. Jo is a 25-year veteran in the technology field with tenure at MCI, Intermedia/Digex, Qwest/CenturyLink in pre-sales technical, selling and management roles.
The standardization of container runtimes and images has sparked the creation of an almost overwhelming number of new open source projects that build on and otherwise work with these specifications. Of course, there's Kubernetes, which orchestrates and manages collections of containers. It was one of the first and best-known examples of projects that make containers truly useful for production use. However, more recently, the container ecosystem has truly exploded. A service mesh like Istio addresses many of the challenges faced by developers and operators as monolithic applications transition towards a distributed microservice architecture. A tracing tool like Jaeger analyzes what's happening as a transaction moves through a distributed system. Monitoring software like Prometheus captures time-series events for real-time alerting and other uses. Grafeas and Kritis provide security polic...